Love, Compassion, and Care: Virtue Science and Exemplarity in Real Life and in the Laboratory

Warren S. Brown, PhD

The purpose of this project is to understand the kind of love, compassion, and care shown by people serving as caregivers in L'Arche communities. This research combines moral psychology and the neuroscience of moral action in the study of these real-world exemplars of virtue. The primary questions focus on the development of such virtues within these exemplary persons, such that it becomes a stable aspect of their character.

Cognitive Disability and Congenital Brain Disorder

Warren S. Brown, PhD
Since 1992, the laboratory of Warren S. Brown, has been studying the cognitive and psychosocial consequences of agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), a congenital condition in which the corpus callosum of the brain is absent from birth. This project studies individuals with ACC (who have normal general intelligence) with respect to their functioning in three domains: interhemispheric interactions, cognitive capacities and psychosocial functioning.

Neuropsychological and virtual classroom performance in children with learning and attention problems: The effectiveness of working memory training

Sarah DeBoard Marion, PhD
This pilot study hopes to accomplish two overarching aims. First, to study attention and working memory skills as measured by performance in a virtual reality classroom or "virtual classroom". Second, to investigate whether working memory training improves neurocognitive and real-world behavior for children with learning and attention problems.

Functional indicators of white matter function, neurocognitive performance, and cognitive training in aging adults

Sarah DeBoard Marion, PhD
This project represents the first of many studies Dr. DeBoard Marion hopes to complete in the area of aging and cognition. Specifically, this project will serve as pilot and/or control data for an ongoing investigation of white matter function as an early indicator of pathological brain changes such as Age-Associated Memory Impairment (AAMI), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and dementia.

Neurocognitive Assessment of Normative Attentional Functioning in a Virtual Environment

Sarah DeBoard Marion, PhD
In this ongoing study, Dr. DeBoard Marion's team has been assessing healthy individuals on a variety of paper-and pencil neuropsychological tests, personality instruments, and novel virtual-reality cognitive tasks. The goal has been to conduct an in-depth study of complex, divided attention across a variety of conditions both in a standard paper-and-pencil fashion and in more and less immersive and complex virtual environments.

Clinical Outcomes Following Hemispherectomy for Intractable Epilepsy

Sarah DeBoard Marion, PhD
This project is a collaborative effort between Dr. Marion, her students, and researchers at UCLA. In this study, individuals with a history of hemispherectomy were identified, contacted, and asked to return to UCLA to undergo neuropsychological and functional assessment. It represents one of the largest studies of the neurocognitive and functional outcome of hemispherectomy patients to date.

Autonomic Psychophysiology and Behavior

Archibald Hart, PhD
This is an investigation of the variability in heart rate in high stress states. The goal is to develop a psychophysiological tool for assessing stress non-invasively by measuring the push-pull of the sympathetic/parasympathetic systems. Several studies comparing panic anxiety disorder with normal controls have demonstrated the variability of this approach. In addition, measures of skin conductance, facial muscles responses, and heart rate have been used to study emotional reactivity and levels of spirituality.



2013-2014 Fellows

The School of Psychology offers multiple Research Fellowships every year. The following fellows are associated with Neuropsychology and Neuroscience Research.
  • Shin George, Weyerhauser Research Fellowship
  • Anthony Junod, Weyerhauser Research Fellowship
  • Amanda Panos, Weyerhauser Research Fellowship