Course Descriptions

Fall 2013

September 30 through December 13

NE502: Exegetical Method and Practice

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the basic principles and practices of New Testament exegesis. Special attention will be given to the use of lexica, concordances, grammars, theological and exegetical dictionaries, and other exegetical aids. Through the written assignments and exegetical papers the students will be exposed to how exegetical decisions are made, some of the underlying hermeneutical issues involved, and how to move from exegesis of the text to our appropriation of it in life and ministry.

Class meets Monday evenings.

NS501: New Testament 2: Romans–Revelation

This course constitutes an introduction to the nature, structure, and message of the New Testament letters, and the Apocalypse of John, in their historical, literary and canonical contexts.

Class meets Thursday evenings.

OT502: Hebrew Prophets

This course will examine the Former Prophets and the Latter Prophets in the Old Testament (i.e., the historical books from Joshua to Kings and the prophetic books from Isaiah to Malachi), focusing attention on the historical, literary, and theological aspects of this portion of Scripture.

Class meets every other Friday evening/Saturday during the day, see the course schedule below for specific dates.

CH500: Early Church History

An introduction to the more important themes, people, events, and doctrines in church history. Attention will be given to a variety of leading apologists, theologians, monastics and church leaders of the church in the West and in the East, from the post-apostolic fathers through about the end of the sixth century.

Class meets every other Friday evening/Saturday during the day, see the course schedule below for specific dates.

YF519: Adolescent Faith Longevity

This course is designed to help students understand the dynamics of long-term faith development among adolescents. This course will weave together theological reflection and social science research in a Practical Theology approach that will primarily focus on 3 contexts: the adolescent's family, the youth ministry, and the overall congregation.

Class meets Monday afternoon/evenings.

Winter 2014

January 6 through March 21

LG502A: Beginning Hebrew

This course is designed as an introduction to biblical Hebrew. Students will gain a basic understanding of the vocabulary, morphology, and syntax of the Hebrew language, as well as how to utilize grammatical and lexical reference tools, in order to use the language as a tool for the exegesis of the Old Testament.

Class meets Tuesday evenings.

NS537: Parables of Jesus

The main objective of this class is to introduce the students to the principles for interpreting the parables of Jesus as found in the Synoptic Gospels. Attention will be given to the history of interpretation of the parables, the strengths and weaknesses of different hermeneutical principles used to interpret the parables, and how to teach or preach from the parables.

Class meets as a one-week intensive January 6-11.

CH506: American Church History

A survey of the American church from Puritanism to the present, outlining significant issues affecting the history of the American church.

Class meets as a one-week intensive January 13-18.

PH522: Perspectives on Christ and Culture

The church has long debated how Christians ought to relate to their cultural surroundings. This course will introduce students to a range of philosophical perspectives on how Christians can read, critique, transform, enjoy, and create culture.

Class meets every other Friday evening/Saturday during the day, see the course schedule below for specific dates.

CO510: Speech and Thought

This course explores the interrelationship between speech and thought. It does so in order to improve students' conceptual processes as well as their ability to share those developed conceptual processes with others through external communication. In addition to focusing on public speaking techniques, this course is designed to address all three levels of spoken language-intrapersonal, interpersonal, and person-to-persons-as they relate to effective communication in ministry.

Class meets every other Friday evening/Saturday during the day, see the course schedule below for specific dates.

Spring 2014

March 31 through June 13

LG502B: Beginning Hebrew

This course is designed as an introduction to biblical Hebrew. Students will gain a basic understanding of the vocabulary, morphology, and syntax of the Hebrew language, as well as how to utilize grammatical and lexical reference tools, in order to use the language as a tool for the exegesis of the Old Testament.

Class meets Tuesday evenings.

NE506: NT Exegesis: 1 Corinthians (Greek text)

This course will focus on detailed exegesis of the book of I Corinthians. Emphasis will be on Greek exegesis, interpretive problems and theological implications of the text.

Class meets Monday evenings.

CH503: Medieval and Reformation Theology

A survey of the diversity of medieval theology as it developed from an essentially Augustinian source in its encounter with new conflicts and cultural factors and as it eventually promoted and provoked the Protestant Reformation. The period addressed covers through the Council of Trent and the death of Calvin.

Class meets every other Friday evening/Saturday mornings, see the course schedule below for specific dates.

ET521: Sexuality and Ethics

Popular Western culture is highly sexualized; our identities have become hitched to our sexuality, including our sexual practices or "preferences." Contemporary Western Christian culture is generally muddled about how our sexuality matters for our discipleship; we often unknowingly adopt the assumptions of our broader culture and fail to reflect on the implications of doing so for our life and witness. This course explores our sexuality from a theological perspective and encourages development of an alternative vision for how our sexuality matters for our personal discipleship and communal witness.

Class meets Thursday evenings.

TH550: World Religions in Christian Perspective

The purpose of this course is twofold. First it will provide an overview of the world's major religions--Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, and Sikhism (time permitting)--focusing on their emergence and history, core beliefs and practices, religious texts and interpretations, as well as contemporary influence and expressions. Second, this course introduces various approaches on how Christianity relates to other religions and religious pluralisms, technically known as the "theology of religions." We will critically discuss Catholic and Protestant proposals and responses and attempt an outline of an Evangelical approach and briefly touch on the nature of interfaith dialogue. Explorations in comparative theology will also be attempted.

Class meets as a one-week intensive May 5-9.

CN535: Grief, Loss, Death, and Dying

The pervasiveness of loss and grief, the inevitability of death, the nature of human suffering, and the mystery of healing will be the theological and experiential themes for this course. This course will be both an academic exploration of these themes and a laboratory to assist the student in their own experiences of loss. Topics to be covered will include biblical perspectives on death, perspectives on death in different stages of life, the faces of grief, multicultural perspectives on grief, and issues for pastoral care.

Class meets Tuesday mornings.

Please note that the courses listed above are subject to change.

Consult the Registrar's Course Schedule for further details and any updates.

Contact
(626) 584-5200
(800) 235-2222
135 N. Oakland Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91182

Directions/Maps

Admissions
admissions@fuller.edu