Courses of Study


CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Clinical Psychology Department Faculty 

  • Alexis D. Abernethy, Professor of Psychology 
  • Justin L. Barrett, Professor of Psychology and Thrive Chair for Applied Developmental Science 
  • Jeffrey P. Bjorck, Professor of Psychology 
  • Warren S. Brown, Jr., Professor of Psychology 
  • Alvin C. Dueck, Professor of Psychology  
  • Brad D. Strawn, Evelyn and Frank Freed Professor of the Integration of Psychology and Theology  
  • Siang-Yang Tan, Professor of Psychology 
  • Mari L. Clements, Associate Professor of Psychology 
  • Winston Earl Gooden, Professor of Psychology  
  • Joseph M. Currier, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
  • Cynthia B. Erickson, Assistant Professor of Psychology  
  • Joey J. Fung, Assistant Professor of Psychology  
  • Seong-Hyeon Kim, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
  • Sarah DeBoard Marion, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
  • Sarah A. Schnitker, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
  • Stephen W. Simpson, Assistant Professor of Psychology  
  • Maria S. Wong, Assistant Professor of Psychology  
  • Richard L. Gorsuch, Senior Professor of Psychology 
  • Archibald D. Hart, Senior Professor of Psychology 
  • Richard A. Hunt, Senior Professor of Psychology 
  • H. Newton Malony, Senior Professor of Psychology  

 

Courses are offered for 4 quarter units of credit unless otherwise noted.

 

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (PG)  

PG 800 History and Systems of Psychology.Traces the emergence of psychology as an independent discipline from its roots in philosophy, theology and the natural sciences. (Second year) 

PG 808 Independent Readings.Special or advanced reading in areas not covered by regular courses in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit if a new area is chosen. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Variable credit) 

PG 810 Physiological Psychology. An overview of the major theories, issues, data and research methodologies of physiological psychology.

PG 811 Introduction to Human Neuropsychology and Assessment.An overview of the behavioral and psychological manifestations of brain injury and disease in human beings. Introduction and practice with neuropsychological assessment.   Prerequisite: PG810. 

PG 820 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior. An overview of the major theories, issues, data and research methodologies of cognitive psychology.

PG 830 Social Psychology. An overview of the major theories, issues, data and research methodologies of social psychology.

PG 840 Personality. An overview of the major theories, issues, data and research methodologies of the psychology of personality.

PG 843 Psychopathology.An overview of the major theories, concepts, issues, data and research methodologies of psychopathology, including an introduction to official diagnostic nomenclature.

PG 850 General Linear Models: Regression.Concepts and techniques of hypothesis development, experimental design, data analysis, and an introduction to APA style for research reports. (First year) 

PG 851 General Linear Models: ANOVA. The design and analysis of multivariable experiments and quasi-experiments. Prerequisite: PG850.  

PG 852 Advanced Research Methods.This course focuses on individual hypothesis formulation, and the planning, execution, and reporting of a psychological experiment. Prerequisite: PG851. (Third year PhD) 

PG 853 Program Evaluation.This course covers the major models and methods of evaluating the effects of intervention packages or programs on individuals, couples, families, groups and organizations. Prerequisite: PG851.  

PG 855 Psychometric Theory.An introduction to principles of psychometric theory, with a specific focus on the development, selection, use, and evaluation of standard psychological assessment instruments for clinical and research applications. Prerequisite: PG851.

PG 856 Research Colloquium.Colloquia are offered nine times per year by distinguished research psychologists. Students in the first three years of the program are expected to attend 18 of the 27 lectures featured during these years. (2 units) 

PG 857 Individual Research.Assigns credit for independent research and evaluation projects conducted prior to the dissertation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: PG855 and permission of the instructor. (Variable credit) 

PG 860 Training Lay Counselors in the Church. This course provides an overview of a biblical approach to lay Christian counseling, and covers a model developed by the course instructor for training and using lay Christian counselors in the church.  Other lay training models and programs in Christian counseling, and relevant literature on lay pastoral care in general, will also be briefly reviewed.

PG 861 Hierarchical Linear Modeling. The goal of this course is to gain familiarity and build expertise in the use of HLM. Emphasis is placed on the mastery of concepts and principles, development of skills in model building and results interpretation, and development of critical analysis skills in understanding research using HLM.  

PG 862 Latent Variable Modeling.This course provides an introduction to principles and methods of factor analysis, latent class analysis, item response theory, and latent profile analysis.

PG 865 Master's Research. The project is typically an empirical research study. If a theoretical master's project is completed, the dissertation must be empirical in nature. Prerequisite: PG855..

PG 900 PhD Dissertation.The project constitutes the equivalent of a half-time load for four quarters and is designed to be completed during the fifth year. Prerequisite: Completion of master's research project. (32 units required) 

PG 901 PhD Dissertation Continuation. To be used when a student has fulfilled the 32-unit PG900 requirement. (0 units)

PG 902 PsyD Dissertation. The project may be a program evaluation, integrative literature review, scientific case study, program development, intervention evaluation, or some other empirically based project. Prerequisite: PG853. (8 units required) 

PG 903 PsyD Dissertation Continuation. To be used when a student has fulfilled the 8-unit PG902 requirement. (0 units)

 

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (PC) 

PC 803 Legal and Ethical Issues.An overview of the legal and ethical issues currently facing clinical psychologists. Particular attention is paid to matters of confidentiality, informed consent, conflicts of interest, sexual involvement, commitment proceedings, advertising, and potential church/state conflicts. (2 units) 

PC 804 Introduction to Psychological Assessment.An introduction to theories of intelligence, administration and scoring of standard intelligence/achievement tests, other measures of psychological and personality functioning, and simple report writing.  

PC 809 Clinical Interventions: Humanistic.  The course utilizes a variety of teaching methods including lecture and discussion, role-playing, review of expert videotaped sessions, and supervised clinical training.  Students learn how to offer and accept clinical feedback as a tool for professional growth.  Increased awareness of one's own feelings and behaviors in session, and how to use both for therapeutic advantage, constitute important components of the course.  

PC 810 Clinical Interventions: Psychodynamic. Introduction to psychodynamic models of functioning and therapy. Prerequisite: PC809.

PC 811 Clinical Interventions: Gerontology. Introduction todisorders, development, and treatment of older adults. Prerequisites: PC810, PC814, PC819.

PC 812 Clinical Interventions: Consultation and Supervision. Drawing from community psychology, organizational, industrial, and systems theory, several consultation and supervision models are presented. Prerequisites: PC810, PC814, PC819.

PC 813 Clinical Interventions: Child/Adolescent. Introduction to disorders and treatment of children and adolescents. Prerequisites: PC810, PC814, PC819.

PC 814 Clinical Interventions: Diversity Issues. Diversity issues in the delivery of clinical services are the focus of this course. Prerequisites: PC810, PC819.

PC 816 Program Administration.This course covers the basic principles and methods of developing and managing organizations devoted to the delivery of professional psychological services.

PC 817 Marketing Professional Services. This course covers the basic principles and methods for marketing psychological services.  (2 units) 

PC 818 Clinical Interventions: Group Psychotherapy. Introduction to the provision of psychotherapy in group settings. Prerequisites: PC810, PC814, PC819.

PC 819 Clinical Interventions: Cognitive and Behavioral. This course provides an overview of cognitive and behavioral therapy, with special focus on a case formulation approach and interventions.

PC 820 Practicum 1. A 9-month, 10-12 hours per week (PhD) or 12-month, 12-15 hours per week (PsyD) clinical practicum. Prerequisite: PC803.

PC 821 Practicum 2. A 9-month, 6 hours per week clinical practicum, normally in an outpatient setting. Prerequisite: PC820.

PC 824 Clerkship.A 12-month, 12-16 hours per week clinical placement designed primarily to provide intensive experience in diagnosis and assessment. Prerequisite: PC821 and PC804.  

PC 827 Consultation Group.This course provides a forum for case presentation and case conceptualization, as well as opportunity for discussion of integrative case material and professional formation issues. (0 units) 

PC 836 Human Sexuality.This course is designed to meet California requirements for training in the physiological, psychological, and social-cultural variables associated with sexual identity, sexual behavior, and sexual disorder. 

PC 838 Alcoholism and Substance Abuse.This course is designed to meet California requirements for training in the detection and treatment of alcoholism and chemical dependency. Prerequisite: PG810. (2 units) 

PC 840 Pre-Internship. A 12-month, 12-16 hours per week clinical placement for PhD students only. (4 per quarter for 4 quarters) 

PC 841 Internship. A 12-month full-time clinical placement at an APA-accredited or APPIC-member site. Prerequisite: PC840 (PhD) or PC824 (PsyD). (12 units per quarter for four quarters) 

PC 843 Internship Continuation.   

PC 851 Grief and Loss. This course will examine how people move toward restoration after bereavement and other significant losses. It will provide a review of historical developments and the theoretical/empirical status of the psychology of grief and bereavement.

 

PSYCHOLOGY (PE)  

PE 800 Contemporary Kleinian Theory. This clinical seminar is designed as an introduction to Kleinian theory, often referred to as the object relations model of psychoanalysis. Prerequisite: PC810.2 units. 

PE 801 Contemporary Object Relations: Technique. This clinical seminar is an advanced course in psychoanalytic technique from an object relations perspective. Prerequisite: PC810.2 units. 

PE 802 MMPI. This course introduces students to the MMPI-2, one of the most commonly used objective psychological assessment tools.In this class students will learn to administer, score, and interpret the MMPI-2.Prerequisite: PG855. 2 units. 

PE 803 Rorschach. This clinical seminar is designed to introduce students to administration, scoring, and interpretation of the Rorschach Inkblot Technique, using Exner's Comprehensive System. Prerequisite: PC804. 2 units. 

PE 804 Neuropsychological Assessment. This course provides a more in-depth treatment of the principles and practices of neuropsychological assessment. This course builds on competencies gained in PG811, and is designed for those considering neuropsychological careers. Prerequisite: PG811.    

PE 805 Child and Family Assessment. This course covers a biopsychosocial approach to the evaluation of children, families, and couples.  Formal assessment (e.g., psychological tests) as well as informal assessment (e.g., observation) will used in evaluating children and families, diagnosing effectively, and developing appropriate  interventions and recommendations. Prerequisite: PC804. 

PE 807 Qualitative Research Methods.  This course focuses on methodological approaches and analysis for qualitative data. The course will address the interface between qualitative and quantitative methods as well as qualitative research and practical theology. Prerequisite: PG850.2 units. 

PE 808 Child Neuropsychological Assessment.  This course is designed provide an introduction to the critical issues involved in the neuropsychological assessment of children.  Topics include overview of neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders; administration, scoring, and interpretation of pediatric neuropsychological instruments; and differential diagnosis and treatment planning. Prerequisites: PC804, PG810, PG811. 2 units.  

PE 810 Play Therapy.  This course will provide students with an overview of the major historical theoretical approaches to play therapy, an opportunity to develop assessment and conceptualization skills drawn from these theoretical perspectives, a foundation in applying these theories to clinical interventions, and an awareness of issues relevant to the field of play therapy. 2 units.  

PE 811 Advanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  This course builds on competencies gained in Clinical Interventions: Cognitive and Behavioral.  In addition to exploring further cognitive and behavioral therapeutic interventions, the course also covers the use of such treatments in different populations. Prerequisite: PC819.2 units.  

PE 813 Psychopharmacology. This course will provide a basic understanding of psychopharmacology so as to facilitate collaborative discussions with physicians and psychiatrists, and to permit the clinician to make intelligent referrals for psychotropic medications. Prerequisites: PG810, PG843. 2 units.   

 

INTEGRATION (PI)  

PI 800 Introduction to Integration.This course is designed to furnish the foundation for later integration seminars and to provide guidance for integrative thinking in other courses. The course provides a review of crucial models, methods, and topics.

PI 801 Integration Symposium. An integration seminar built around the annual Integration Symposium lectures and the responses from the three Fuller faculties. The topic, structure, and availability of this course varies from year to year. Prerequisite: PI800. (2 units)  

PI 803 Special Projects in Integration.An independent study in integration which may focus on conceptual-theoretical issues, professional concerns, or other special applications. Does not qualify as one of the four required integration courses, but may be used for elective credit in psychology or theology. Prerequisite: PI800 and permission of sponsoring professors.  

PI 805 Readings in Integration. Special or advanced integration readings not covered by regular integration courses. Prerequisite: PI800 and permission of integration chair. 

PI 806A/B Advanced Integration. This course is designed to assist students in reflecting on the relationship theology/religion has to their studies in clinical psychology in their final year of coursework.   Students will be expected to develop and articulate an integrative perspective from their field of doctoral study. Prerequisite: PI800. 

PI 811 Christian Who Counsel. This course examines the theological and psychological aspects of the therapist, considering the self as an integrative triad of physical, social, and spiritual spheres. Prerequisite: PI800.

PI 813 Portraits of Human Nature. This course will attempt to establish a perspective on human nature that allows greater resonance and integration between science and faith. It will present descriptions emerging from biology, genetics, neuroscience, and cognitive psychology, while considering their philosophical, theological, and ethical implications. Prerequisite: PI800.  

PI 814 Spiritual Interventions in Therapy. This seminar will provide an opportunity for reflection on a Christian approach to therapy.  Topics will include the person of the Christian therapist, theological perspectives on the role of the Holy Spirit, the role of worship, and spiritual interventions in therapy.

PI 815 Spiritual Transcendence and Health. This course will examine key concepts that are foundational to the empirical study of the relationship between spirituality and health. The emphasis will be on spiritual transcendence, religious experience, and forgiveness. Prerequisite: PI800.   

PI 817 Foundations of Christian Therapy. This course will provide an introduction to the foundations of a biblical, Christian approach to psychotherapy.  Topics covered include assumptions about human nature and sources of truth, spiritual resources, spiritual issues in therapy, and intrapersonal integration and the spirituality of the therapist and client. Prerequisite: PI800.  

PI 818 Arts, Spirituality, and Transformation. The primary objective of this course is to deepen students’ ability to apply the scientific understanding of religious experience. The use of music in ministry to facilitate personal and spiritual transformation will be examined from theological, psychophysiological, and psychological perspectives. Prerequisite: PI800.  

PI 819 Communities and Caring for Children at Risk. This course focuses on theological, community psychology, and ecological principles for working with at-risk children in both international and local contexts. This class explores best practices for nurturing the positive development of at-risk youth through the identification, empowerment, and mobilization of resources within the community as well as the covenant community of the church. Prerequisite: PI800.   

PI 824 Theological and Psychological Models of Disorder. The purpose of this course is to examine scientifically the models of disorder from both psychological and theological perspectives. Models for understanding the conceptual distinctness as well as the areas of overlap will be examined, discussed, and developed. Prerequisite: PI800.   

PI 825 Integrative Issues in Cross-Cultural Setting (Guatemala). During this 2-week course in Guatemala, students learn how mental health needs are being addressed in a country that has been ravaged by political violence and poverty.

PI 826 Trauma and Faith. This course will provide a basic understanding of the post-trauma reaction and the etiology of traumatic distress. In addition, the course will address theological insights in trauma response and recovery throughout the quarter. Prerequisite: PI800.   

PI 827 Psychology of Grief and Bereavement. This course will focus on how people move toward restoration after bereavement and other significant losses. It will provide a review of historical developments and the theoretical/empirical status of the psychology of grief and bereavement. Prerequisite: PI800.   

PI 833 Psychology of Religion. An overview of the major theories, issues, data, and research methodologies of the psychology of religion. This course is highly recommended as a supplement to the integration curriculum, especially for those who plan undergraduate teaching careers.

 

FAMILY PSYCHOLOGY (PF)  

PF 800 Introduction to Family Systems. The objective of this course is to acquaint the beginning student of marriage and the family with the framework commonly known as "systems theory."

PF 814 Family Therapy. This course is designed to provide an overview of major models of family therapy.

PF 815 Marital Therapy. This course is designed to provide an overview of the primary approaches to marital/couple treatment.  The course will address theories of marital interaction and two approaches to clinical treatment with couples. Assessment and treatment issues regarding domestic violence will be discussed. 


 


MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Marriage and Family Department Faculty  

  • Cameron Lee, Professor of Family Studies 
  • Terry D. Hargrave, Professor of Marital and Family Therapy 
  • James L. Furrow, Eveyln and Frank Freed Professor of Marital and Family Therapy 
  • Pamela Ebstyne King, Assistant Professor of Marital and Family Studies 
  • Lisseth Rojas-Flores, Assistant Professor of Marital and Family Therapy 
  • Miyoung Yoon Hammer, Assistant Professor of Marital and Family Therapy  
  • Jack O. Balswick, Senior Professor of Sociology and Family Development 
  • Judith K. Balswick, Senior Professor of Marital and Family Therapy  

Courses are offered for 4 quarter units of credit unless otherwise noted. Master's-level Marriage and Family Department courses are generally available only to marriage and family department students, unless otherwise noted.

 

FAMILY STUDIES (FS) 

FS 500 Family Systems Dynamics.This course prepares the student of marriage and family to conceptualize the dynamics of family relationships in systemic terms. The course examines a variety of issues related to the social processes within the family itself, including how families handle stress and conflict. Particular emphasis is given to family communication and the application of systemic thought to the ministry setting of the local church. Open to all students.  

FS 501 Gender and Sexuality.This course examines the social, psychological, physical, ethical and theological dimensions of gender and human sexuality. The course focuses on sexual issues and the redefinition of gender roles in the family as well as the sexual counseling in which MFT students learn to diagnose, assess and treat sexual dissatisfactions within the scope of their clinical practice.

FS 505 Child and Family Development.This course offers an overview of human development in the context of the family and culture and explores how human development and family systems might impact various forms of ministry, missions and therapy. Major developmental theorists are briefly covered in the context of how personality development is understood within a familial context. Open to all students.  

FS 510  Human Development in Context.  This course provides an integrated overview of the process of human development and social systems. The course addresses psychological, cultural, and theological perspectives on the nature of personal and social development. Development will be explored from the poles of flourishing and languishing as informed by humankind¿s origin in God. A lifespan approach will explore core areas of identity development, including: moral/faith, gender and sexuality, family, and cultural/ethnicity. Similarly, the course will address developmental challenges, including: abuse, addiction, disability, family dysfunction, poverty, and political oppression. Students will also reflect on their own life experiences in the light of the course content. Nor School of Theology and School of Intercultural Studies students only. SCR 

FS 511 Cultural and Ethnic Issues in Marital and Family Intervention.This course explores the various cultural and ethnic issues that affect family therapy and enrichment. While the course examines a wide variety of cultural and ethnic family systems, special emphasis is placed on understanding the specific issues related to the practice of family therapy and education with African-American, Latino/Hispanic, and Native-American families.

FS 529 Ministry Issues in Gender and Human Sexuality.This course focuses on sexuality issues relevant to persons in Christian ministry by considering the spiritual, psychological, sociological, and physiological aspects of human sexuality. Offered only as an online course.Open to all students.  

 FS 810 Human Development in Context. Entering students are presented an overview of the major theories, issues, data, and research methodologies of the life span covering infancy through senesence. (First year)  

 

FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION (FL) 

FL 501 Family Life Education.This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of family life education methodology, including a rationale for the use of preventive psychoeducational strategies in family ministry. The course adopts a strength-based "wellness" approach and focuses on training the students in foundational skills as family life educators. Open to all students.  

FL 502 Parent Education and Guidance.This course introduces students to models of parenting practice, and how parents guide and influence children and adolescents. Specific attention is given to the role of parent-child interaction in the emotional development of children. Open to all students.  

FL 504 Marriage and Interpersonal Relationships.This course prepares students to develop and lead relationship and marriage enrichment seminars in local church settings. Lectures address a variety of relationship issues, including formation and dissolution, the role of emotions, gender differences, and exercises will address general communication skills pertinent to all relationships, with to others and their specific application to marriage. Open to all students.  

FL 511 Advanced Family Life Education.This course offers a 40-hour intensive training workshop in which students learn role play and coaching skills, and work in teams to present course materials for immediate feedback. Students who successfully complete the course are certified as Family Wellness Instructors. Open to all students. Prerequisite: FL501, with a grade of B or better; or consent of instructor. (2 units), Pass/Fail 

FL 550 Family Life Education Internship.This course is a two- or three-quarter internship under the supervision of a MF faculty who assists the student in an applied experience in family life education. 2/4 units (for a total of 6), Pass/Fail
 

FL 801 Family Life Education. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of family life education and methodology.  Lectures will present an ecological model of family resilience which forms the basis for a philosophy of both prevention and educational intervention.  Lectures will also demonstrate the applicability of the model to congregational settings.  The course adopts a strength-based “wellness” approach, utilizing education techniques from Family Wellness©, with special emphasis on the student’s development of presentation skills, including the use of roleplay and coaching.  Issues of planning, implementation, and evaluation will also be addressed. 

FL 590 Directed Study in Family Life Education.(1-4 units) 

 

FAMILY INTEGRATION (FI) 

FI 500 Introduction to Integration.This course seeks to address an orientation to the various ways of interpreting the task of "integration," and their relevance to the student's own personal and spiritual development. Topics such as the purpose and value of theological study, an overview of integrative elements of the curriculum, and an anthropological and covenantal model for unifying various perspectives on the human person and family relationships are addressed. (2 units)  

FI 503 Advanced Integration Seminar. This capstone course will begin by reviewing the concept of integration as Christian integrity presented in the first quarter. The course will proceed in two intertwined directions, based on the students’ personal and clinical experiences since beginning the program: (a) the exploration of vocation and identity related to the clinical virtues of Sabbath-oriented self-care, humility, compassion, and peacemaking, and (b) clinical considerations of how to address spiritual issues in therapy. The goal is to assist students in continuing to develop their own perspectives and convictions regarding integration and therapy as a Christian vocation. Prerequisite: FI500. 2 units.  


FI 515Forgiveness, Reconciliation and Clinical Practice. This course is designed to provide an overview of the primary approaches, applications, and research related to the area of forgiveness in clinical practice.  Forgiveness assessment, issues concerning domestic violence, infidelity, as well as the theological and intergenerational implications of forgiveness are discussed.

FI 531 Theological and Clinical Exploration ofShame and Guilt. This course explores what it means to be an integrated person, psychologically, spiritually and interpersonally with particular emphases on shame and guilt.  Attention is given to integrating theological and psychological theory and practical application for work with clients in diverse racial, ethnic and denominational family contexts. Open to all students.  

FI 540 Narrative and Family Life.This course is an introduction to the relevance of narratives and the formation of story in the lives of families, through an exploration of postmodern approaches to family theory. The application of narrative to conceptions of healing and wholeness are explored, with particular emphasis upon the themes of love and loss/suffering. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the value of narrative constructs in both family counseling and ministry. Open to all students.  

FI 815Forgiveness, Reconciliation and Clinical Practice. This course is designed to provide an overview of the primary approaches, applications, and research related to the area of forgiveness in clinical practice.  Forgiveness assessment, issues concerning domestic violence, infidelity, as well as the theological and intergenerational implications of forgiveness are discussed.

FI 831 Theological and Clinical Exploration ofShame and Guilt. This course explores what it means to be an integrated person, psychologically, spiritually and interpersonally with particular emphases on shame and guilt.  Attention is given to integrating theological and psychological theory and practical application for work with clients in diverse racial, ethnic and denominational family contexts.
 

FI 840 Narrative and Family Life.This course is an introduction to the relevance of narratives and the formation of story in the lives of families, through an exploration of postmodern approaches to family theory. The application of narrative to conceptions of healing and wholeness are explored, with particular emphasis upon the themes of love and loss/suffering. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the value of narrative constructs in both family counseling and ministry.

FI 590 Directed Study in Family Integration.(1-4 units) 

 

FAMILY RESEARCH (FR) 

FR 501 Research Methods, Statistics, and Design.This course is an overview of the principal concepts of social science research methodology and associated statistical procedures, and the relevance of these to evidence-based clinical practice and professional development. Special emphasis is given to survey research methodology and a synthesis of qualitative and quantitative approaches is encouraged. Open to all students. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in either statistics or basic research methods is strongly recommended 

FR 590 Directed Study in Family Research.(1-4 units) 

FR591 Master's Thesis. Assigns credit for research conducted for completion of a master's thesis. Prerequisite: FR501 or permission of the instructor. (8 units required) 

FR592 Master's Thesis Continuation. To be used when a student has fulfilled the 8-unit FR591 requirement. (0 units) 

 

FAMILY THERAPY (FT) 

FT 502 Legal and Ethical Issues in Family Practice.This course offers a survey of the legal and ethical issues relevant to the practice of marriage and family therapy. These topics include confidentiality, informed consent, dual relationships, licensing standards, and family law. Students learn the application of ethical principles to specific professional and moral dilemmas. The course includes a review of California laws governing the practice of marriage and family therapists.

FT 508 Psychopathology and Family Systems.This course is a study of psychopathology and maladaptive behavior in the context of the family. Emphasis is placed upon developmental diagnosis and the diagnostic nomenclature of the DSM IV-TR. Prerequisite: FS500 and FS505. 

FT 514 Family Therapy.This course introduces an integrative approach to engaging in family therapy. Building on communication, structural, strategic, developmental, narrative, contextual, and brief models, this approach includes gender, culture, and spiritual dimensions when doing therapy with families. Prerequisite: FS500. 

FT 515 Marital Therapy.This course provides an overview of leading approaches to marital/couple treatment. The course addresses theories of marital interaction and approaches to clinical treatment. Assessment and treatment issues involving domestic violence are reviewed.

FT 520 Child and Adolescent Therapy.This course offers an introductory survey on issues related to the diagnosis and treatment of children and adolescents both in individual and family settings. Cognitive-behavioral and family therapy techniques for common childhood and adolescent issues such as depression, oppositional disorder, anxiety, abuse, eating disorders, substance abuse and suicide are explored. Prerequisite: FS500, FS505, FT508, and FT522. 

FT 522 Assessment.This course provides an overview of approaches to the assessment of relationship problems with individuals, couples, and families. Emphasis is placed on psychometric theory and the use of relevant psychological testing instruments for assessment and research in marriage and family therapy.

FT 526 Addiction and Family Treatment. This course provides the student with an understanding of alcoholism and the most commonly abused drugs, and examines the current treatment modalities with emphasis upon the Twelve Step programs and their place in the treatment continuum. Emphasis is placed upon learning the language of recovery and how to work with both the addicted person as well as the codependent and family members. Community referral resources and therapy techniques suitable for the marriage and family therapist in the treatment and referral of families affected by addiction are also covered.

FT 527 Divorced and Reconstituted Families.This course provides an overview of the major changes and challenges faced by families in the process of divorce and remarriage. Special attention is placed upon therapeutic interventions that are helpful to families during times of significant disruption and transition. The role of religious beliefs and practices are also explored as unique factors shaping the impact of divorce and remarriage on family life. Prerequisites: FS500, FT502. 

FT 534 Brief Therapy.This course provides training in brief therapy models and their use in marital and family therapy. Emphasis is placed on Solution, Focused, and Narrative applications. The class includes an emphasis on the integration of these models with a theological perspective. (2 units)Prerequisite: FT515.  

FT 535 Group Therapy.This course examines the role of group psychotherapy for the family therapist. The course focuses on both the theoretical and practical aspects of group dynamics, processes, and methodologies available to the family therapist. Specific types of group therapies, including topic/skill centered, couples, and multi-family groups are discussed. (2 units) 

FT 549 Psychopharmacology.This course is designed to provide MFT students with a basic knowledge of psychopharmacology - its scope, effectiveness and hazards. An understanding of when and how to request a consultation for medication, as well as the important role of psychotherapy in supporting the appropriate use of psychopharmacological agents are covered. Prerequisite: FT508. 

FT 557 Research And Clinical Practice.This course is designed to further student competence in applying research principles and findings to clinical practice. Students are expected to review and summarize extant empirical research literature on a topic related to the practice of marital and family therapy. (1 unit) Prerequisite: FR501 and FT502.

FT 561 Advanced Family Therapy Techniques.  This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to advance their theoretical and technical application of a family of origin therapy, a structural therapy and a strategic therapy.  Assessment, conceptualization, and techniques in each theoretical perspective are discussed and role played.

FT 562 Medical Family Therapy.This course is designed to give an overview of the theories and practices of medical family therapy.  Various models of interdisciplinary collaboration that help facilitate holistic care for clients in both medical and non-medical settings are discussed.  The influence of one¿s belief systems on perceptions of illness and health is explored.

FT 590 Directed Study in Marital and Family Therapy.(1-4 units) 

 

 CLINICAL TRAINING (FT) 

FT 530 Clinical Foundations.This clinical training course assists first year students in the practice of basic counseling skills with individuals, couples and families. This learning experience spans the first two quarters of studies and includes role-playing, audio-video taped feedback, and participation in triads. The course includes a focus on professional development and practical training in responding to ethical and legal issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. (2 units) 

FT 550 Practicum.Students enroll in a total of 12 units of practica over a period of 10-15 consecutive months. During this clinical placement each student trainee engages in a minimum of 300 hours of direct counseling experience, at least 150 hours of which must be with children, couples, groups, or families. In addition, each student must receive a minimum of 60 hours of individual or 120 hours of group supervision to be compliant with California state regulations. All practica are graded on a Pass/Fail basis. (2 or 4 units) 

FT 550C Practicum Consultation Group.Practicum students are required to attend one hour per week of practicum consultation during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters of their second year in the program. Practicum consultation provides an opportunity for program faculty to promote and review a student's clinical development. (0 units; to be registered concurrently with practicum) 

FT 555 Practicum Continuation.To be used when a student has fulfilled the 12 unit practicum requirement without completing the 300 hour requirement, or desires to fulfill other state requirements that exceeds 300 client contact hours. (0 units) 


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