Courses of Study

This list of courses offered by the School of Theology and their descriptions are subject to change through normal academic channels. Not all courses are available on all campuses or on a regular basis. A schedule of courses and expanded course descriptions are published in advance of each quarter. The information in these publications supersedes the information in this catalog. 

Common abbreviations and terms that appear in certain course descriptions are explained below:

MDiv core: OTC.Meets a Master of Divinity core requirement. The capitalized letters that follow indicate the core area which the course meets in the Master of Divinity curriculum. Refer to the complete list of these core area abbreviations in the Master of Divinity degree program section of the catalog. These abbreviations also appear in quarterly class schedules. A current list may be found at schedule.fuller.edu//registrar/schedule/attributes.html.
 

MA: SCR, MAT, MATM, MACL, MAIS.Meets one of the Seminary core requirements (SCR) or one of the core degree requirements in one or more of  several MA degrees. These abbreviations also appear in quarterly class schedules. These abbreviations also appear in quarterly class schedules. A current list may be found at schedule.fuller.edu//registrar/schedule/attributes.html.

Crosslist: For the course description, locate the course number that follows in the PhD Courses section of this catalog.

 

COURSES OF STUDY: BIBLICAL STUDIES DIVISION 

 

BIBLICAL STUDIES DIVISION FACULTY 

  • John Goldingay, David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament 
  • J. Andrew Dearman, Professor of Old Testament 
  • Joel B. Green, Professor of New Testament Interpretation 
  • Seyoon Kim, Professor of New Testament 
  • Marianne Meye Thompson, George Eldon Ladd Professor of New Testament Interpretation 
  • James T. Butler, Associate Professor of Old Testament 
  • Richard J. Erickson, Associate Professor of New Testament 
  • Mignon R. Jacobs, Associate Professor of Old Testament 
  • Pamela J. Scalise, Associate Professor of Old Testament 
  • David J. Downs, Assistant Professor of New Testament Studies 
  • Christopher B. Hays, D. Wilson Moore Assistant Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Studies  
  • Jin Ki Hwang,Assistant Professor of New Testament 
  • J. R. Daniel Kirk, Assistant Professor of New Testament  
  • Kyong Jin Lee, Assistant Professor of Old Testament Studies 
  • Love L. Sechrest, Assistant Professor of New Testament  
  • Leslie C. Allen, Senior Professor of Old Testament 
  • Donald A. Hagner, George Eldon Ladd Professor Emeritus of New Testament and Senior Professor of New Testament 
  • Arthur G. Patzia, Senior Professor of New Testament 

 

BIBLICAL LANGUAGE STUDIES (LG) 

The teaching of Hebrew and Greek is under the supervision of the Old Testament and New Testament Departments. The beginning courses are taught by resident or adjunct faculty.

Biblical Hebrew. A knowledge of biblical Hebrew that is sufficient to begin exegetical work in the Old Testament is a prerequisite for the required Old Testament book study (designated OTBE or OTCE in the quarterly course schedule). LG502 Beginning Hebrew (8 units) is designed to give a student this ability. It is offered over two quarters (4 units per quarter), beginning in Fall Quarter or Winter Quarter. It is also offered in an intensive format (8 units in one quarter) on the Pasadena campus. Students who have already acquired a knowledge of biblical Hebrew, either by course work or self-study, may meet this requirement by passing a reading evaluation examination in biblical Hebrew and may then substitute electives of their choice. No credit is given for passing the exam. Students may contact the Academic Advising Office to schedule the examination.

New Testament Greek. A reading knowledge of New Testament Greek is a prerequisite for many of the New Testament courses in the MDiv and D.Min. programs. Reading knowledge means a knowledge of Greek vocabulary and grammar that is sufficient to begin exegetical work in the New Testament. LG512 Beginning Greek (12 units) is designed to give a student this ability. It is offered over three quarters (4 units per quarter), beginning in the Fall Quarter. It is also offered in an intensive format (12 units in one quarter) on the Pasadena campus.

Students who have already acquired a knowledge of New Testament Greek, either by course work or by self-study, may meet this requirement by passing the Greek Waiver Examination, which may be scheduled through the Academic Advising Office. The examination is designed to test the student's ability to read and translate the New Testament in Greek, to recognize and identify common words and forms, and to explain the more common syntactical constructions. Students who pass this exam receive a waiver for the 12-unit requirement in New Testament Greek in the MDiv curriculum and may substitute electives of their choice. Passing of the exam also meets the Greek prerequisite for New Testament courses requiring Greek. In any case, no credit is granted for passing the exam.

 

LG 502 Beginning Hebrew.The elements of Hebrew vocabulary, morphology and grammar. Offered as a two-quarter course, four units per quarter. Also offered as an intensive course in one quarter. Also taught in Spanish. 8 units. MDiv core: HEB.

LG 506 Advanced Hebrew Grammar.This course is devoted to discussing and elucidating problems in Hebrew phonology, morphology, and syntax beyond the work possible in LG502 and the MDiv exegetical core courses. In order to accomplish this goal, the course surveys the History of the Hebrew Language from its origins up until the Rabbinic period (ca. 1400 BCE-200 CE). Attention will be paid to diachronic aspects (e.g., archaic Hebrew, late Biblical Hebrew, Rabbinic Hebrew), dialects (e.g., northern vs. southern), and register (e.g., poetry vs. prose, vernacular vs. literary). Prerequisite: LG502 and permission of instructor. 

LG 512 Beginning Greek.The elements of New Testament Greek vocabulary, morphology and grammar, along with concentrated experience in reading from the Greek New Testament. Offered as a one-quarter intensive course or over three quarters. Also taught in Spanish. 12 units. MDiv core: GRK.

LG 517 Greek Reading.Selected readings in biblical Greek designed to enable students to read extended passages with facility. Course can be repeated one time for credit as LG518. Prerequisite: LG512. 

LG 518 Greek Reading. Same course as LG517 but with a different selection of readings. Course can be repeated one time for credit as LG517. Prerequisite: LG512.

LG 525 Biblical Aramaic. The elements of biblical Aramaic learned through study of the Aramaic portions of Ezra and Daniel. Prerequisite: LG502. 

LG 533 Beginning Ugaritic.This course, the first of a two-course sequence, will provide the student with an introduction to the orthography, phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Ugaritic language. Since it is necessary to provide the unvocalized text with vowels, the course is also an excellent introduction to Comparative Semitic phonology and morphology. Prerequisite: LG502. 

LG 534 Advanced Ugaritic. This course, a continuation of Beginning Ugaritic, LG533, will be devoted to further reading of Ugaritic literature. Prerequisite: LG533. 

LG 535 Beginning Akkadian.A graded introduction to the grammar and writing system of Old Babylonian Akkadian. During this course we will read, in cuneiform copies and transliteration, a variety of genres of Akkadian texts: contracts, laws (Hammurabi's Code), omens, letters, royal inscriptions and hymns and prayers. Along our journey we will pay some attention to the history, culture, and religion of the Ancient Near East, the background of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: LG502 or permission of instructor. 

LG 536 Advanced Akkadian.This course continues the graded introduction to the grammar and writing system of Old Babylonian Akkadian begun in LG535/835. During this course we will read, in cuneiform copies and transliteration, a variety of genres of Akkadian texts: contracts, laws (Hammurabi's Code), omens, letters, royal inscriptions and hymns and prayers. Along our journey we will pay some attention to the history, culture, and religion of the Ancient Near East, the background of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: LG535.

LG 546 Northwest Semitic Texts.This course will introduce the student to the more important remains of the literature of the NW Semitic sphere from the first millennium B.C., i.e., Old Phoenician, Old Aramaic, Old Hebrew, and Moabite. Prerequisite: LG502. 

LG 590 Directed Study in Language. Advanced study or special projects may be arranged through the Old Testament or New Testament departments.

 

NEW TESTAMENT EXEGESIS (NE) 

NE 502 Exegetical Method and Practice.Basic principles and practice of exegesis in the Greek New Testament, with attention to methodological and bibliographical resources. Also taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: LG512. MDiv core: HERM. 

NE 503 Biblical Interpretation.This course surveys the practice of interpretation from the first century to the present, examines the methods of interpretation for the different genres of the Old Testament and the New Testament, and applies the results of interpretation to worship, theology, teaching, and spiritual formation.

NE 506 New Testament Exegesis (Greek text). Advanced exegetical study of the Greek text of a New Testament book or books or portions of a New Testament book. Prerequisites: LG512 and NE502. NS500 or NS501 may be required for some classes. MDiv core: NTE.

NE 517 New Testament Exegesis (Modern text). Exegetical study of the text of a New Testament book or books or portions of a New Testament book in a modern language. Prerequisite: NS500 or NS501, depending on the book.

NE 561 Luke and the American Road Movie. This course will pursue a dialogue between the biblical journey motif in Luke and the American road movie, engaging such shared themes as pilgrimage, dislocation, race, gender, wealth, family, community and reconciliation. The course will (1) study the chief passages and theological themes found in the extensive journey motif in the Gospel of Luke, (2) view and discuss selected American road movies, (3) facilitate a cultural and theological dialogue between the two, and (4) foster interpretive skills for biblical narrative and contemporary film.

NE 567 New Testament Exegesis (Modern text). Exegetical study of the text of a New Testament book or books or portions of a New Testament book in a modern language.

NE 590 Directed Study in Hermeneutics or New Testament Exegesis. 

 

NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES (NS) 

NS 500 New Testament 1: Gospels and Acts. An introduction to the nature, structure, and message of the New Testament Gospels and Acts in their historical, literary, and canonical contexts. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: NT1. MA: MAT. 

NS 501 New Testament 2:Romans-Revelation. An introduction to the literature of Romans through Revelation, including attention to the background, critical issues, and theological motifs. Also taught in Spanish. M Div. core: NT2. MA: MAT. 

NS 509 Life of Jesus.A study of the Gospels which focuses on the content of Jesus' message, the events of his life and his understanding of his mission. Prerequisite: NS500 or NT500. MDiv core: NTT. 

NS 511 Emergence of the Church.A study of the nature of the church in the New Testament through an examination of the biblical theology of the church, resurrection, the Holy Spirit, ministry, baptism and the Lord's Supper. Prerequisite: NS501 or NT500. MDiv core: NTT. 

NS 512 Jesus and the Kingdom of God.A study of the central message of Jesus. His proclamation of the Kingdom of God is examined together with his actualization of it in his ministry. His Kingdom parables receive a special treatment, but his attitude to the law and the Temple is also examined. The course is focused on the question of Jesus' self-understanding and his aim expressed in his Kingdom preaching, and it climaxes with an exploration of the relationship between Jesus' Kingdom preaching and the apostolic gospel. Prerequisite: NS500. MDiv Core: NTT.  

NS515 The Old Testament in the New.An investigation into the various ways in which the New Testament writers employed the Scriptures of Israel as witnesses to Jesus and to the church's calling to live faithfully as the people of God. Students will assess NT writers' use of scripture and explore possible ramifications for how contemporary Christians should read the Old Testament. NS501 or NT500. MDiv core: NTT. 

NS 522 Wealth and Poverty in the New Testament.An examination of theological perspectives on wealth, poverty, and justice in a variety of biblical traditions, with a special focus on the New Testament witness. In addition to considering the literary, socioeconomic, and religious contexts of Scripture's discussions of wealth and poverty, this course shall also address questions concerning the responsible stewardship of wealth and possessions in an age of consumerism. Prerequisite: NS500 or NS501 or NT500. MDiv core: NTT.   

NS 522 The Parables of Jesus. The main objective of this class is to introduce the students to the principles for interpreting the parables of Jesus as found in the Synoptic Gospels. Attention will be given to the history of interpretation of the parables, the strengths and weaknesses of different hermeneutical principles used to interpret the parables, and how to teach or preach from the parables.Prerequisite: NS500 or NT500. MDiv core: NTT.   

NS 524 Critical Issues in John.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: NT824. Prerequisites: NS500, NS501, NE502 and permission of the instructor.  

NS 525 The Cross in the New Testament.A study of the rich and various interpretations of the death of Jesus in the New Testament. Attention will be paid to Jesus' own understanding of the purpose of his death; various images used in the New Testament to articulate the significance of his death, particularly within the context of the Old Testament Scriptures; and contemporary objections or questions raised with respect to traditional expositions of the death of Jesus. Prerequisites: NS500 and NS501, or NT500. MDiv core: NTT.   

NS 531 Pauline Theology.A study of Paul's theology against his Jewish and Hellenistic background and in the light of his life and missionary situations. The course concentrates on a systematic exposition of christology, soteriology, eschatology and other leading themes. Yet Paul's relationship to Jesus-tradition and the pre-Pauline tradition, his use of Scripture, and his response to the needs in his mission fields are also examined in order to delineate the development of his theology and to understand his method of theologizing. Also taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: NS501 or NT500. MDiv core: NTT.  

NS 563 Race and Christian Identity in the New Testament.This course develops a biblically-based, theological approach to identity by exploring the relationship be­tween racial identity, ethnic identity and Christian identity in the writings of Paul. Lectures and discussions about selected passages and secondary literature about identity help students understand the biblical world-view, Greco-Roman thought, and modern and post-modern trends on the subject of racial and ethnic identity. Students will be exposed to several biblical, theological, and theoretical approaches to this topic in Pauline literature that will be used to construct a uniquely Christian posture about race issues in society. Prerequisite: NS500 or NS501 or NT500. MDiv core: NTT.   

NS 590 Directed Study in New Testament Theology. 

 

NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES (NT)  

NT 500 New Testament Introduction. This course orients students to the literature of the New Testament in its various literary, historical, and theological contexts and to New Testament interpretation in service of Christian practice.  MA: SCR. 

NT 560 The New Testament in Its Ancient Contexts.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: NT860. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.   

NT 566 Critical Issues in the Study of Paul. An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: NT866. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.   

 

OLD TESTAMENT (OT) 

OT 500  Writings as Introduction to the Old Testament. The course introduces study of the Old Testament as the Word of God, a work of literature, a work emerging out of Israel's history, and a work that needs to be studied critically to grasp its significance. It focuses on the third section of the Jewish canon, the Writings: Psalms, Job, Proverbs, the Scrolls (Ruth, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Lamentations, and Esther), Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles.MDiv core: OTC. M.A.: SCR  

OT 501 Pentateuch.The contents and theology of the first five books of the Old Testament. Primary attention will be given to literary nature and structure and theological message. Theories of origin and genetic development will also be covered. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: OTA. MA: MAT. 

OT 502 Hebrew Prophets.The content and literary qualities of the Former and Latter Prophets in light of their historical background and their developing theological content. MDiv core: OTB. 

OT 506 Old Testament Exegesis: Prophets. Exegetical study of the Hebrew text of an Old Testament book or portions of an Old Testament book in the Prophets. Prerequisite: LG502. MDiv core: OTBE. 

OT 507 Old Testament Exegesis: Writings. Exegetical study of the Hebrew text of an Old Testament book or portions of an Old Testament book in the Writings. Prerequisite: LG502. MDiv core: OTCE. 

OT 517 Old Testament Exegesis (Modern text). Exegetical study of the text of an Old Testament book or portions of an Old Testament book in a modern language. Prerequisite: OT507. 

OT 531 The Geography of Palestine.A study of the physical and historical geography of Palestine as a necessary background to Old Testament interpretation. Slides will be used to illustrate the terrain and topography.

OT 534 Old Testament Theology.An introduction to the various approaches to the problematic nature of Old Testament theology. Emphasis given to the theology of the Psalter and to the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. Prerequisite: OT501. MDiv core: OTB or OTC. 

OT 554 Ancient Near Eastern and Ancient Israelite Religion.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: OT854. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

OT 567 Old Testament Exegesis (Modern text). Exegetical study of the text of an Old Testament book or portions of an Old Testament book in a modern language.

OT569 Old Testament Theology Seminar.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: OT805. Prerequisites: LG502, OT501, OTB and OTCE or OTBE and OTC and Permission of instructor. 

OT 570 Job and Human Suffering.Examines critically the book of Job from the perspectives of its meaning in its ancient context and its continuing significance for the modern community of faith. Addresses thematic and structural issues and explores parallels with other ancient Near Eastern representatives of theodicy literature.

OT 583 Ancient Near Eastern History, Literature, and Culture.A study of Ancient Near Eastern history, literature and culture which begins with the emergence of culture in the Fertile Crescent and includes events until the division of Alexander's empire. Special attention is directed to the Sumerians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Phoenicians, and Hebrews.

OT 588 Old Testament Critical Approaches.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: OT801. Prerequisites: LG502; OTA; OTB and OTCE or OTBE and OTC; and permission of instructor. 

OT 590 Directed Study in Old Testament. 


COURSES OF STUDY: THEOLOGY DIVISION 

THEOLOGY DIVISION FACULTY 

  • James E. Bradley, Geoffrey W. Bromiley Professor of Church History 
  • William A. Dyrness, Professor of Theology and Culture 
  • Robert K. Johnston, Professor of Theology and Culture 
  • Veli-Matti  Kärkkäinen, Professor of Systematic Theology 
  • Howard J. Loewen, Professor of Theology and Ethics 
  • Richard J. Mouw, Professor of Christian Philosophy 
  • Nancey Murphy, Professor of Christian Philosophy 
  • Cecil M. Robeck, Jr., Professor of Church History and Ecumenics 
  • Charles J. Scalise, Professor of Church History 
  • Marguerite Shuster, Harold John Ockenga Professor of Preaching and Theology 
  • Glen H. Stassen, Lewis B. Smedes Professor of Christian Ethics 
  • John L. Thompson, Professor of Historical Theology and Gaylen and Susan Byker Professor of Reformed Theology 
  • Grayson Carter, Associate Professor of Church History 
  • Oliver D. Crisp, Associate Professor of Systematic Theology 
  • Todd E. Johnson, William K. and Delores S. Brehm Associate Professor of Worship, Theology, and the Arts 
  • Erin E. Dufault-Hunter, Assistant Professor of Christian Ethics 
  • Nathan P. Feldmeth, Assistant Professor of Church History 
  • Oscar A. Garcia-Johnson, Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology 
  • Hak Joon Lee, Assistant Professor of Theology and Ethics 
  • Colin Brown, Senior Professor of Systematic Theology  

   

CHURCH HISTORY AND HISTORY OF DOCTRINE (CH) 

CH 500 Early Church History. A survey of the early church from the post-apostolic fathers through the Council of Chalcedon. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: CHA. 

CH 501 Patristic Theology.A survey of doctrinal development in the early church from the second century A.D. as far as Augustine in the West and John of Damascus in the East. MDiv core: CHA. 

CH 502 Medieval and Reformation History. The further development of the church, especially in the West, from Gregory the Great through the Reformation. Also taught in Spanish MDiv core: CHB. MA: MAT. 

CH 503 Medieval and Reformation Theology.A survey of doctrinal development in the West emphasizing the Augustinian heritage both of the medieval scholastics and of the Reformers, from the fifth to the 16th century. MDiv core: CHB. MA: MAT. 

CH 504 Modern Church History. The shaping of modern movements and churches from the Reformation to the Ecumenical Movement and Second Vatican Council. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: CHC. MA: SCR. 

CH 505 Post-Reformation and Modern Theology.A survey of Christian thought from the English Reformation to the present, emphasizing Protestant orthodoxy, Puritanism, Pietism, and the theology of Wesley, Schleiermacher and Barth. MDiv core: CHC. 

CH 506 American Church History.A survey of the American church from Puritanism to the present, outlining significant issues affecting the history of the American church. MDiv core: CHC. 

CH 508 Historiography.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: CH808. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

CH 516 Theology, Politics, and Modern Society.This seminar examines the political thought of leading twentieth-century theologians, including Barth, Bonhoeffer, Moltmann, Cone, and Segundo, with emphasis on questions of authority, human rights, equality, and liberation. An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: CH801. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

CH 517 Christian Spirituality.A survey of the practice of piety in the Roman Catholic, Reformed and Arminian traditions with a focus upon the distinctive theology of each.  

CH 527 Christianity and Science in Historical Perspective. Scientific development since the sixteenth century has affected nearly every aspect of human culture--including the Christian church. This course will examine both the ancient harmony and modern tension that have developed when Christian theology and scientific inquiry intersect. The scope of study will range from the foundations of Western science in ancient Greece, to recent developments in biology, cosmology, physics, psychology, and medicine.

CH547 History and Development of Pentecostal-Charismatic Movements.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: CH847. Prerequisites: CH504, 505 or 506 and permission of instructor. 

CH 549 Presbyterian Creeds.Designed to enable students to enter into the theological ethos of the Presbyterian tradition. Reformed theology, culture, and tradition will be studied in its historical context and applied to the contemporary church. Special attention will be given to the Reformed confessions. Students who have not completed the MDiv core requirements in Systematic Theology and/or Church History are advised to consult with the professor before registering for this course.

CH 551 American Presbyterian History and Programs.Study of Presbyterianism from Scotland to the American Colonies and throughout the States with focus upon the development of distinctive themes in Presbyterianism.

CH 575 Women in Church History and Theology.This course seeks to explore the experiences and contributions of women in the church from the post-apostolic period through the Protestant Reformation, together with the theologies and presuppositions which sometimes supported but more often discouraged their full participation in church and religious life.

CH 579 The Church in Modern Society.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: CH879. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

CH 590 Directed Study in Church History. 

   

CHRISTIAN ETHICS (ET) 

ET 501 Christian Ethics.This basic introduction to ethics aims to develop a systematic way of thinking about Christian morality, bringing biblically based convictions to bear on important moral problems. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: ETH. MA: SCR, MAT. 

ET 503 Bible and Social Ethics.An examination of the variety of normative roles that Scripture has played in social analysis and criticism within the 20th century, with special emphasis on evaluating the normative role that Scripture should play as an "authority" in social ethics. MDiv core: ETH. 

ET 513 Perspectives on Social Ethics.An exploration of the sociopolitical implications of biblical faith, with reference to such topics as political authority, the task of the state, and the ground of Christian political involvement. Differing Christian perspectives will be examined. MDiv core: ETH. 

ET 520 Biblical and Practical Peacemaking.This course addresses the topic of Christian peacemaking through an examination of both theological rationales and practical techniques. Differing Christian ethical approaches to peace and war will be discussed, as well as strategies for nonviolence in the context of contemporary culture and its challenges.

ET 525 Ethics of Bonhoeffer.A concentrated address to Bonhoeffer's ethics as a means of understanding how Jesus Christ can be served in the conflicts of this world.

ET 532 Method for Concreteness in Christian Ethics.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: ET832. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ET 533 Christian Discipleship in a Secular Society.A study of urgent ethical issues in the church's ministry to persons caught in the cross-pressures of secular society with concentration on Bonhoeffer's Cost of Discipleship, family ethics, the economic debate and welfare reform, racism, nationalism, Christian community and an authentically transformationist understanding of the church's mission in the world. MDiv core: ETH.  

ET 535 The Ethics of Life and Death. In our age of technology, the most fundamental issues concerning the beginning of life (e.g. prenatal screening, abortion, reproductive technologies, embryonic stem cell research) and death (e.g. active and passive euthanasia, organ and tissue donation, quality vs. quantity of life) have become dizzyingly complicated. Additionally, it is challenging to know how Scripture can inform these ethical issues, given the distance of the Biblical world from our medicalized, biotechnological society. This course offers an opportunity to investigate both secular and religious approaches, with an emphasis on how Christians uniquely understand these issues from within the story of God.

ET 537 Anabaptist Ethics and Theology. An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: ET837. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ET 540 Peacemaking in IOsrael and Palestine. A travel/study course in Israel and Palestine with intensive interaction with persons on both sides of The Wall who are working to do peacemaking, and with each other in the group. An exploration of the relationship between biblical faith and the difficult struggles for justice, security, and peacemaking between Palestine and Israel. An opportunity to get to know both Israelis and Palestinians who are working on peacemaking in practical ways in a very difficult context. A call for us to learn from them and to go and do likewise, wherever we are or will be.

ET 542 Faith and Politics. How do we call churches to faithful discipleship following Jesus in a society where polarized political ideologies work hard to co-opt churches for their purposes? Research by the Barna group and the Pew Research Center indicates a dramatic backlash against Christianity by many young adults and a doubling of secularists and atheists in the ten years from 1996 to 2006, largely because of what they see as authoritarian and uncaring political advocacy. Several evangelical leaders such as Ron Sider, David Gushee, Paul Freston, Greg Boyd, Shane Claiborne, Rick Warren, Bill Hybels, and David Kuo have indicated that evangelicals need to repent for having been misled into unfaithful political alliances, and/or they are developing a significantly more faithful social witness tradition. We will probe how we can lead churches in more faithful ways.

ET 543 The Theology and Ethics of Martin Luther King, Jr. This course studies the dynamic and holistic nature of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s theology and ethics in conversation with critical issues facing a global pluralistic society, such as racism, classism, militarism, religious conflicts, and moral fragmentation. The discussion includes the sources, expansion, application, and enduring legacy of King's theology and ethics today.

ET 548 Philosophy of Justice in an Age of Interaction.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: ET848. Prerequisites: one course in Ethics and permission of the instructor. 

ET 590 Directed Study in Ethics. 

    

THEOLOGICAL LANGUAGE STUDIES (LG) 

Auditing of the following courses is not permitted without transcript evidence of prior study. All courses must be taken for a grade (Pass/Fail is not an option).

LG 565 Theological French. This course is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of French. Students will be introduced to French vocabulary and grammar necessary for reading and translating the Bible, theological journal articles and books in academic research. Students will also be introduced to available resources and tools for reading and translation of French texts.

LG 566 Theological German. This course is designed to introduce theological students to a reading knowledge of the German language with special emphasis on theological German. No knowledge of German is presupposed.

LG 567 Theological Latin.This course will submerge the student in the Latin language through daily readings in classical, medieval, and modern Latin texts.

   

PHILOSOPHY (PH) 

PH 504 Christian Worldview and Contemporary Challenges.An introduction to basic themes in a Christian perspective on reality, with a focus on the differences between Christian thought and such contemporary movements as secular humanism, the New Age cults, and recent "post-modern" philosophical perspectives. Explores the proper contours of a biblically grounded world-and-life view. MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 508 Issues in Apologetics.An examination of assorted challenges to Christian belief, and a survey of resources for meeting those challenges. Sample topics: the problem of evil, challenges from science, the plurality of religions and worldviews. MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 510 Christian Apologetics.An introduction to the history and methods of apologetics in a pastoral context. The course includes development of a pastoral method of apologetics and the application of this method to various apologetic problems. MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 512 Christianity and Western Thought.An introduction to philosophical thinking, exploring the historical relationship between Christianity and Western thought. The course is based on a selective study of thinkers and movements from Plato to the present day. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 514 Topics in Philosophy of Religion.An examination of three major areas in philosophy of religion: (1) faith and reason (including epistemology, the justification of religious belief, theological method); (2) the relation between Christianity and science (including historical issues, evolution and creation, the apologetic value of science); and (3) the nature of the human person (dualist and physicalist accounts, religious experience, life after death). MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 517 Philosophical Hermeneutics. In its narrower sense, hermeneutics is the theory of interpreting texts, especially normative texts such as legal or sacred texts. "Philosophical hermeneutics" signifies a broader account according to which human understanding is interpretation not just in the reading of texts but in all our construals of the world, of ourselves and others, including God. All our "seeings as" . . . , e.g., seeing God as a personal creator or seeing ourselves as created in God's image, are interpretations. Thus, philosophical hermeneutics is a form of epistemology, exploring the nature and limits of human understanding. After a quick historical overview of the philosophical context, we will read relevant selections from Gadamer as well as from critics of the tradition he represents. We'll conclude with a look at the hermeneutics of suspicion and the biblical sources "plagiarized" by Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud. MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 522 Perspectives on Christ and Culture. The Christian community has long debated the appropriate ways for Christians to relate to their cultural surroundings. This course will focus on some key perspectives, beginning with a critical examination of the typology made popular by H. Richard Niebuhr in his classic study, Christ andCulture. Special attention will be given to "cultural mandate" theories, as well as to the contemporary relevance of traditional notions of common grace, natural law, and general revelation as they have been used to discern created commonalities that undergird a plurality of cultures. The present-day interest in "multi-culturalism" will also be explored. MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 530 Anglo-American Postmodernity. The term "postmodern" is used in a variety of ways: to refer to developments in art and architecture, in contemporary culture generally, in Continental philosophy, and in English-language (Anglo-American) philosophy. This course focuses on the last of these--radical changes in philosophical views of knowledge, language, human nature, and causation. The thesis of the course is that the modern worldview, as reflected in modern philosophy, was inhospitable to Christian faith and practice; thus these postmodern developments offer exciting opportunities for new approaches in theology, biblical studies, Christian ethics, apologetics. MDiv core: PHIL. 

PH 548 Theological Uses of Postmodern Philosophy.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: TH806. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

PH 552 Methods in Philosophy.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: PH852. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

PH 590 Directed Study in Philosophy of Religion. 

   

THEOLOGY (ST, TH) 

ST 501 Systematic Theology I: Theology and Anthropology.The doctrines of revelation and Scripture. The doctrines of God, God's attributes, and God's trinitarian mode of existence. The doctrines of creation and providence. The origin and nature of humankind; the doctrines of the fall and sin. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: STB. MA: MAT, MATM. 

ST 502 Systematic Theology II: Christology and Soteriology.The doctrine of divine election, the covenant of grace, the person and work of Christ the Mediator. The doctrines of divine calling, regeneration, repentance, faith, justification, adoption and sanctification. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: STB. 

ST 503 Systematic Theology III: Ecclesiology and Eschatology.The doctrine of the church, its nature and authority. The worship of the church, the sacraments and prayer. The doctrine of last things, death and resurrection, the final judgment, heaven and hell. Also taught in Spanish. MDiv core: STC. 

ST 511 Orientation to Theological Studies. This course is designed as an introduction to theological research tools for incoming students. Research methods along with scholarly presentations will be discussed in an attempt to assist students as they appropriate and develop their own theological insights and resources. Also taught in Spanish.  

ST 529 Theological Method.An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: ST829. Prerequisites: Courses meeting MDiv core in the following areas: STA, STB, STC, PHIL, and permission of the instructor. 

ST 555 Teología de la Comunidad Latina  This course introduces the student to the major themes and specialized disciplines that deal with U.S. Latino(a)/Hispanic communities. The approach is practical and intends to forge a critical environment for interpreting religious practices, culture, ministry models, and social structures that so far have shaped the contours of Latino living. The end product is a critical ecclesiology for churches whose constituency is the Latina community or whose intention is to embrace such a community and issues at some point. Taught only in Spanish. 

ST 572 Bonhoeffer: Life and Thought.Traces the development of Bonhoeffer's theology through the major stages of his life and critically evaluates his contributions to contemporary theology.

ST 578 The Shape of Liturgical Theology. An advanced seminar primarily for doctoral students open on the 500 level on a limited basis to qualified master's-level students. Crosslist: ST878 . Prerequisite:  Permission of the instructor.

ST 574 Theology of C. S. Lewis.A survey of the entire range of C. S. Lewis's theological and imaginative writings with a view to his major themes, both apologetic and spiritual.

ST 588 Theology of Africa, Asia and Latin America.A survey of theological themes arising in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Important thinkers and movements are studied in their cultural context.   

ST 590 Directed Study in Theology.

TH 550 World Religions in Christian Perspective.The purpose of this course is two-fold.  First it will provide an overview of the world's major religions, namely, Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, and Sikhism, focusing on their emergence and history, core beliefs and practices, religious texts and interpretations, as well as contemporary influence and expressions. Second, this course introduces the student to various approaches on how Christianity relates to other religions and religious pluralisms, technically known as the "theology of religions.`" Catholic and Protestant proposals and responses will be critically discussed and an outline of Evangelical approach will be attempted. Case studies are conducted regarding Islam-, Hindu-, Buddhist-and Sikhi-Christian encounters. 

 TH 560 Anglican Theology.What are the theological distinctives of Anglicanism? Do they lie in its theology, doctrine, method or practice? Or do they exist at all? This course aims to explore the unique theological identity of Anglicanism which underlies its claim to be both Catholic and Reformed and the implications of this for other traditions. 

 

THEOLOGY AND CULTURE (TC) 

TC 500 Theology and Culture.This course is an introduction to contemporary culture, its philosophies and practices, and the challenges and opportunities it presents to effective Christian ministry and mission. 

TC 511 Theology and Hip-Hop Culture.This course is an introduction to the basic issues of a Christian interpretation of hip hop culture. Its purposes are to briefly introduce students to the major theological and biblical perspectives that have been developed in approaching hip-hop culture and to develop in the student a practical and biblical wisdom whereby cultural artifacts may be understood and engaged. The purpose in the broadest sense is to develop a hip-hop cultural literacy. A major part of the course will focus on particular cultural texts in order to practice strategies of reading and interpretation that are informed by Christian perspectives.  

TC 512 Theology and Media Culture.The course will investigate visual media culture, with an emphasis on television, exploring the theological implications of television and mass media upon culture, and in turn seek a theological engagement with the diverse and varied contours of visual media. We live in an age where television is acquiring a renewed influence upon society. Cable networks, advances in media technology, and access are making television a prime location for cultural reflection and impact.  

TC 516 Theology, Worship, and Art.This course is an introduction to Christian reflection and practice in the visual arts. Emphasis will be on developing a Christian perspective on the arts and aesthetics that is informed by biblical, historical and theological resources and that is familiar with ways the major Christian traditions have made use of the arts. By lectures, discussions, projects and museum visits, students will engage with significant examples of art as a way of developing a critical appreciation and a Christian appropriation of this dimension of life--with respect to its value for worship and witness. 

TC 521 Theology and Contemporary Literature.This course will explore (1) modern and post-modern attitudes toward the "spiritual/transcendent/God" found in selected American literature and (2) a variety of means for theological dialogue with these works. Writings by Kesey, Updike, O'Connor, DeVries, Potok, Morrison, Robbins, Kingsolver, and Lamott, as well as selected essays in critical theory will be read. While debunking or listening, symbolizing or secularizing, arguing or affirming, American fiction over the last fifty years is often found interacting with the religious/spiritual currents that pervade our culture. As such, it invites dialogue from a theological perspective.

TC 530 Theology and Film. This course will consider one particular aspect of a theology of culture, theology and film. The course will view and discuss selected films, provide the student the critical skills helpful for film interpretation, and explore possible theological approaches to film criticism.  

TC 531 Postmodern Theology, Film, and Youth Culture.Seeking to introduce students to the theological and social dimensions of the forces that shape contemporary human culture, this course will engage postmodernity theologically by studying one of adolescents' primary sources of meaning: the movies. This course will investigate some of the social, ethical, and psychological implications of postmodern film upon theology, and in turn seek a theological engagement with these movies.  

TC 565 Worship and Culture.This class will explore the relationship of cultures, their values, symbols, and rituals to Christian worship. It will explore national and ethnic cultures, as well as generational, class, artistic, and technological cultures. The course will also focus on gaining an understanding leading to an application of theories of culture and worship.

TC 581 Worship, Theology, and the Arts Touchstone Course.This course is the introductory course for all students entering the Worship, Theology and the Arts master's level degree programs. It introduces students to the methodology that will undergird their theological study of Christian worship, along with narrative, performing, and plastic arts.  Beginning with Augustine's philosophy of language and learning as introduced and developed in De Magistro and De Doctrina Christina, and his assertion that all we have to communicate with are signs, words and gestures, this course will explore methods of exegeting signs and gestures to supplement the exegesis of words.  The course will be divided into modules, each one focusing on the application of this method to Christian worship and two art forms.  One module will also focus on the topic of the Brehm Lectures which the students will be required to attend.


COURSES OF STUDY: MINISTRY DIVISION 

 

MINISTRY DIVISION FACULTY   

  • Chapman R. Clark, Professor of Youth, Family, and Culture 
  • Julie Gorman, Professor of Christian Formation and Discipleship 
  • Yea Sun Eum Kim, Professor of Family Counseling and Korean Family Studies 
  • Richard V. Peace, Robert Boyd Munger Professor of Evangelism and Spiritual Formation 
  • Marguerite Shuster, Harold John Ockenga Professor of Preaching and Theology 
  • Mark Lau Branson, Homer L. Goddard Associate Professor of the Ministry of the Laity 
  • Scott Cormode, Hugh De Pree Associate Professor of the Leadership Development 
  • Carolyn L. Gordon, Associate Professor of Communication 
  • Mark A. Labberton, Lloyd John Ogilvie Associate Professor of Preaching 
  • Juan F. Martinez, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies and Pastoral Leadership 
  • Kurt N. Fredrickson, Assistant Professor of Pastoral Ministry 
  • Ronald J. Kernaghan, Assistant Professor of Presbyterian Ministries and Pastoral Theology  
  • Joy J. Moore, Assistant Professor of Preaching 
  • Douglas H. Nason, Assistant Professor of Communication 
  • Kara E. Powell, Assistant Professor of Youth and Family Ministries 
  • Dale S. Ryan, Assistant Professor of Recovery Ministry  
  • David W. Augsburger, Senior Professor of Pastoral Counseling 
  • William E. Pannell, Senior Professor of Preaching 

 

CHRISTIAN FORMATION AND DISCIPLESHIP (CF) 

CF 500 Teaching for Christian Formation.An introductory course in developing a biblical philosophy of Christian formation through the practice of personal, corporate, and instructional disciplines. Includes a study of the uniqueness of learning theory when it comes to being transformed by biblical content, with implications for the nature, processes and goals of Christian formation ministries in the church. MDiv core: MIN4 

CF 504 Formational Bible Study.A course where students learn Bible study methods to enable change in the life of the participants. Designed to equip the student with tools for seeing, studying, applying and teaching the World of God.

CF 507 Building Christian Community Through Small Groups.Actual development of communities that utilize biblical and social principles while engendering mutual ministry and growth within Christian small groups, particularly in local congregations. Lecture and laboratory. MDiv core: MIN4 

CF 554 Spirituality and Discipleship in College and Young Adult Settings. Exploration of the spiritual life and equipping ministry of those involved in working with collegians. MDiv core: MIN1 

CF 560 Adult Formation and Discipleship.A biblical focus on ministering to adults, with a survey of adult psychological and developmental theories, goals in adult formation, developing adult learning designs, and discipleship models of adult enablement. Recommended background: CF500. MDiv core: MIN4 

CF 565 Empowering the People of God.Explores practical ways in which all Christians can assist each other to understand their faith, deepen community, engender mutual ministry and integrate faith and life, and considers the implications of these for developing a lay spirituality and restructuring the church. MDiv core: MIN1, MIN4 

CF 590 Directed Study in Christian Formation and Discipleship. 

     

COUNSELING (CN) 

CN 503 Personality, Theology and Pastoral Counseling.The development of personality, a theology of human nature, and the study of religious experience will be examined as a theoretical, theological, experiential, and practical base for pastoral caregiving and pastoral counseling. The work of Freud, Jung, Adler, Klein, Horney, Erikson, Miller, Gilligan, Piaget, Kohlberg, Fowler, and others will be critiqued by and correlated with theology and Christian experience. MDiv core: MIN5 

CN 504 Family Therapy and Pastoral Counseling.Family therapy, theology and therapeutic interaction will be integrated as the student explores his or her own multigenerational family system. MDiv core: MIN5 

CN 506 Conflict and Conciliation.Conflict in personal, familial, congregational, and communal life are continuing problems and possibilities in Christian ministry. This course offers an experiential, clinical, theological, and pastoral approach to the management, resolution, transformation, and utilization of conflict in both personal and pastoral perspectives. As an interdisciplinary approach it will draw on communication theory, therapeutic process, conflict studies, and mediation skills. Prerequisite: 96 units completed 

CN 520 Pastoral Counseling. Treats the individual, marital and family problems normally confronting the pastor as counselor. MDiv core: MIN5 

CN 522 Basic Counseling Skills.Examines the relational aspects of counseling with particular emphasis on the practice and attainment of relationship skills within the context of the local congregation. MDiv core: MIN5. 

 CN 535 Grief, Loss, Death and Dying.These major crises of life will be explored experientially, psychologically and culturally. The focus will be on personal growth as the preparation for pastoral presence, caregiving and counseling. MDiv core: MIN5 

CN 546 Familia Hispaña e Identidad Cultural.This course will explore the psychological issues affecting Hispanic families in the United States, within the context of pastoral ministry. Reviewing the concepts of family systems and dynamics, the course seeks to provide students with basic tools to understand generational issues, the concept of the identified patient, and the common stressors faced by families in transition. Students will be challenged to understand their own family dynamics by articulating the behavioral scripts from their cultural heritage by country of origin. Taught in Spanish. MDiv core: MIN5

CN 568 Theological and Pastoral Perspectives on the Contemporary Family.This courses examines perceptions of the family within the Christian tradition, and their relationship to wider cultural concerns in a variety of different historical and contemporary settings. MDiv core: MIN1

CN 590 Directed Study in Counseling or Psychology. 

NOTE: Certain courses in the School of Psychology are open each quarter to qualified theology students 

   

COMMUNICATION (CO) 

CO 500 Communication. Building practical communication skills in various public speaking situations. Credit: 2 units. MDiv core: MIN2 

CO 503 Advanced Communication. Further nurturing of communication skills in public speaking. Credit: 2 units. Prerequisite: CO500 

CO 590 Directed Study in Communication. 

 

   

DENOMINATIONAL POLITY (DP) 

Fuller Seminary is committed to offer whatever courses in denominational distinctives are required for a student's ordination. These courses are offered under the instruction of officially appointed denominational representatives.

In addition to the courses listed in this section, see the following related courses offered in the Church History Department:

  • CH 549 Presbyterian Creeds
  • CH 551 American Presbyterian History and Programs

 DP 500 Reformed Church in America Polity.A study of the Reformed Church in America worship and polity, with emphasis on their ecclesiological underpinnings and their practical outworking. Credit: 2 units. MDiv core: MIN6 

DP 502 Wesleyan Tradition.A historical and comparative survey of the primary theological movements within the United Methodist Church from John Wesley to the present.

DP 504 Reformed Worship. This course focuses on the theology, history and practice of worship in the reformed tradition. Helps develop an awareness of worship from a biblical, incarnational and trinitarian perspective and traces the development of Reformed worship patterns from the Reformation to the present. Explores issues related to the ministry of worship in Presbyterian and Reformed congregations, including the sacraments, prayer, hymnody, weddings, funerals, children and youth in worship, and personal devotion. MDiv core: MIN6 

DP 505 Presbyterian Polity and Worship.Comprehensive perspective on the worship, ecclesiology, confessional heritage, structures and activities of the Presbyterian Church. MDiv core: MIN6.

DP 508 Baptist Doctrine, History, and Polity.Basic Baptist emphases, polity and practice from an historical perspective. Distinctive programs of particular Baptist groups, especially American Baptists. MDiv core: MIN 6. 

DP 512 United Methodist Polity.An introduction to the institutional nature and functioning of the United Methodist Church. Its connectional system, ordination and ministry, legislation, theological contributions and ecumenical relationships. MDiv core: MIN6. 

DP 513 United Methodist History.A survey of the events, issues, doctrines and key persons in the development of the United Methodist Church from its origins in England and America to the present.

DP 516 Anglican History and Polity.Anglicanism was born in crisis, yet grew to become the third largest communion of churches in the world. How did this come about? This course looks at the development of Anglicanism since the Reformation both from a general perspective and from the standpoints of a number of provinces. It also examines how this development is reflected in the diverse forms of Anglican polity to be found in the Communion. By way of case study, students will be asked to reflect upon the history and polity of their own province in particular.

DP 590 Directed Study in Denominational Polity. 

 

  

EVANGELISM (EV) 

EV 500 The Art of Evangelism.A foundational course which explores evangelism from a biblical, theological, historical, and practical vantage point as it seeks to equip students for creative and effective outreach in a variety of settings. MDiv core: MIN1, MIN3. 

EV 509 Spirituality and Creativity for Evangelism and Worship.This course focuses on the need for effective evangelization in today's church, and the opportunities and challenges of the contemporary cultural context in which Christians minister. Its basic premise is that worship is fundamental to the evangelistic enterprise, and consequently the affirmation and renewal of congregational spirituality will be a vital component in effective sharing of faith. This course includes practical exploration of new ways in which this can be facilitated, based on an awareness of the present crisis in modernity, and incorporating insights from the New Testament as well as the experience of the world church, and reflecting current debates on the theology of creativity and the arts and related discussions of creation-centered spirituality and the impact of New Age thinking on the Christian community. MDiv core: MIN1 

EV 514 Urban Evangelism.Concentrates on the city as the locus for ministry at the close of the century. Emphasis will be placed on the peculiar ethos of the city, the church's approach to the urban milieu, and models of current ministry in urban settings. Includes field trips and exposure to persons from urban ministries. MDiv core: MIN3 

EV 519 Evangelismo entre Hispanos. The nature, methods and approaches of evangelism in relation to the nature, problems and needs of urban Hispanic communities. Taught only in Spanish. M. Div. core: MIN3. 

EV 523 Evangelism and Media Culture.This class aims to design a theology of evangelism that acquires an appreciation for and a selective appropriation of our media culture. The class will provide a creative environment to discern the communication patterns in the biblical text and learn from contemporary technologies of communication. M.Div core: MIN3. 

EV 525 Contemporary Culture and Evangelism.By blending together communication theory and cultural analysis, the process of evangelism is considered from the point of view of the one being evangelized. Reaching baby boomers and Generation X will be a special focus. MDiv core: MIN1, MIN3 

EV 532 Recovery Ministry in the Local Church.This course will examine the theological foundations of recovery ministry as well as the personal dynamics of recovery and practical considerations for developing recovery ministries in the local church. 

EV 590 Directed Study in Evangelism. 

   

FIELD EDUCATION (FE) 

Students desiring to receive credit for field education must first (1) enroll with the office of Field Education, which coordinates approved positions in churches and other organizations; (2) register for academic credit within regular quarterly registration deadlines; and (3) complete a preparatory workshop. The completion of the part-time local church internship course yields two units of core credit. This course also requires participation in a theological reflection group which meets during the second quarter of the three quarter internship, and attendance at a minimum of four Ministry Enrichment seminars. A second course, selected from the variety of experiences offered, in a setting approved by the Office of Field Education, is required for the MDiv degree and also earns two units of credit. Additional field education courses may be taken as electives.

Students and their respective pastors/supervisors must complete quarterly evaluation reports and submit them to the Office of Field Education. At the request of the student, these reports will be forwarded to designated authorities to meet the requirements of certain denominations. Students are also required to meet with a member of the staff of the Office of Field Education for an half-hour interview during the first quarter of their internship.

NOTE: Field Education courses FE501-556 are graded only on a "Pass/Fail" basis, and are also offered in the Extended Education Program.

FE 501 Nine-Month Part-time Church Internship.A planned, supervised and evaluated practical experience for nine months (three consecutive quarters) in a church setting with pastoral supervision. MDiv core: MIN7. Credit: 2 units. 

FE 502 Full-Time Church Internship.An approved, planned, supervised and evaluated practical experience under the supervision of a pastor/supervisor in a church, institutional or mission setting for one quarter. Credit: 2 units. 

FE 503 Part-Time Internship.An approved, planned, supervised and evaluated practical experience for nine months (three consecutive quarters) in a church, institutional or mission setting. Credit: 2 units. 

FE 546 Hospital Internship.Orientation and experience in a medical or psychiatric hospital setting for one quarter under the supervision of the hospital chaplain. Credit: 2 units. 

FE 556 Correctional Institution Internship.A practical ministry experience in a correctional institution, either juvenile or adult, for one quarter under the direct supervision of a chaplain. Credit: 2 units. 

FE 561 Leadership I: Foundations for Incarnational Youth Ministries.Practicum in the basic methods of evangelistic youth outreach, emphasizing the development of personal relationships with young people through relevant forms of group ministry. A portion of the course focuses on the recruitment, training and ongoing enabling of volunteers for outreach ministries to youth. Offered only at Fuller in Colorado for Young Life staff. Credit: 4 units. 

FE 562 Leadership II: Building Resources for Incarnational Youth Ministries.This course is designed to build the skills of people in youth ministry as well as their ability to train others in the areas of discipleship, adult ministry, camping, and fundraising. Offered only at Fuller in Colorado for Young Life staff. Credit: 4 units. 

FE 570 Campus Ministries Practicum.Practicum for first-year InterVarsity staff in the basic skills of college campus ministry. It emphasizes the history and basics of InterVarsity ministry, fund development, campus strategy, developing students on campus, inductive Bible study, small group leadership and strategy, and new student outreach. Offered only at Fuller in Colorado for InterVarsity staff. Credit: 4 units 

FE 571 Campus Ministries Practicum II.This practicum course for second-year InterVarsity staff builds on the basic skills in FE570. It covers the content areas of developing a philosophy of ministry, campus evangelism, conference planning and administration, basic caregiving skills, stewardship of life, crosscultural ministry, and multiethnicity. Offered only at Fuller in Colorado for InterVarsity staff. Credit: 4 units 

FE 578 Evangelism Practicum 

FE 590 Directed Study in Field Education. 

   

GENERAL MINISTRY (GM) 

GM 518 Introduction to Urban Studies.This course is designed to introduce students to the complexity of urban studies. Students will interact with professionals who are involved in urban life. Such persons will be guest lecturers and panelists who will integrate social responsibility and religion from various points of view. Perspectives will include politics, business and economics, health and human services, law enforcement, race relations, immigration, and arts and leisure. MDiv core: MIN8. 

GM 550 Leadership and Character Development.This course takes a general look at leadership theory and practice from the light of spirituality and character formation. Additionally, the course looks at the practice of leadership with a focus on self insight, giftedness, personality and styles of leadership. Students produce personal mission statements that allow them to place their leadership contexts in perspective.

GM 554 Leadership and Diversity: Gender, Multicultural, and Ethnicity.This course will provide an overview of the different dimensions and sensitivities that frame the leadership context. Gender, multicultural and ethnicity issues will be explored in relationship to leadership style and practice. Students will be challenged to consider their own blocks to effective leadership in diverse settings. 

GM 578 Ministerio Urbano Hispano.The course uses a theological/sociological approach designed to enhance the student's understanding of the complexities of doing ministry in the urban Hispanic/Latino context. Instructors will expose the students to a variety of disciplines such as urbanology, social psychology, missiology and theology in search of an integrative model of ministry in the city. The course involves doing theological reflections and designing practical ways of developing ministries geared towards effecting social transformation in the Hispanic/Latino communities. Taught in Spanish 

GM 590 Directed Study in General Ministry, 

 

   

PASTORAL MINISTRY AND THEOLOGY (PM) 

PM 503 Pastoral Theology.Theology of the ministry, theology and conduct of worship, liturgy, hymnody, parish responsibilities and procedures, church administration, community relations and ministerial ethics. MDiv core: MIN6 

PM 507 Equipping Pastor.Principles and dynamics useful to the pastor who seeks to enable lay renewal, nurture and ministry in a congregational setting. MDiv core: MIN6. Ogden 

PM 520 Church Management.The process of planning and implementing administration in accordance with theological and denominational purposes of the church; leadership styles for pastor and people. MDiv core: MIN6. 

PM 535 Leading and Developing a Church to Maturity.Churches, like people, go through a maturation process; this process can lead to mature, yet still growing, ministry or life-strangling traditions. This course focuses on how clergy and laity can lead congregations in vibrant, innovative ministry by understanding and nurturing the maturation process. Applying biblical principles and using the case study method, students will learn to evaluate life cycles of churches and to develop strategies to bring about mature congregations. MDiv core: MIN6  

PM 546 Pastoral Theology, Ministry and Ethics from an Anglican Perspective.How does Anglicanism¿s understanding of the Church affect its pastoral theology and practice? How does its doctrine of orders of ministry shape its pastoral care? What theological and practical resources do Anglicans bring to bear on the realities of ministry? And what does the Anglican theological and pastoral tradition have to offer in the face of contemporary ethical issues as they present themselves in pastoral situations? This course brings together insights from practical theology drawn from Anglican writers and practitioners as they reflect upon the resources of their own and other traditions.

PM 590 Directed Study in Pastoral Ministry and Theology. 

 

PREACHING (PR) 

PR 500 Homiletics.Both theological and practical questions about the nature of preaching are explored and discussed. A practicum element is an essential part of this course. Also taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: LG512 and NE502. MDiv core: MIN2 

PR 501 Preaching in the African-American Tradition.Focuses on written and oral communication in the Black church, with particular attention to the preparation and delivery of sermons.

PR 509 Evangelistic Preaching. A practicum utilizing the preaching models relevant for most types of evangelism today. Credit: 2 units. Prerequisite: PR500. MDiv core: MIN2 

PR 511 Preaching Practicum.A practicum centered on student preaching with an emphasis on self and group assessment. The use of videotape will be offered. Course may be repeated once for credit. Credit: 2 units. Prerequisite: PR500. MDiv core: MIN2. 

PR 514 Making Doctrine Live. A practicum focusing on preaching on great doctrinal themes in ways that show their relevance for modern life. Credit: 2 units. Prerequisite: PR500. M. Div. core: MIN2 

PR 516 Variety in Preaching.A practicum focusing on promoting variety (with respect to sermon design, occasions, genres of biblical literature) in text-based preaching. Credit: 2 units. Prerequisite: PR500. MDiv core: MIN 2 

PR 517 Preaching for Occasional Services.This preaching practicum is designed to provide students with practice in preparing sermons for special ministry occasions. Preaching texts will be assigned to address pastoral situations such as funerals, weddings, baptisms, the celebration of the sacrament/ordinance of the Lord's Supper, a revival meeting, and an interdenominational service of worship. Credit: 2 units. Prerequisite: PR500. MDiv core: MIN 2 

PR 525 Foundations for Biblical Preaching.A homiletics course for those in M.A. programs who also feel called to preach. The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the elements of sermon preparation and delivery. It will place emphasis upon the character of the preacher and the challenge of communicating the Gospel in today's cultural milieu. The course includes a practicum component. Prerequisites: at least one course in biblical studies.  

PR 590 Directed Study in Preaching. 

   

SPIRITUALITY AND SPIRITUAL DIRECTION (SP)  

SP 500  Spiritual Traditions and Practices. Spiritual practices emerge out of spiritual traditions which, in turn, often emerge from the life and experience of spiritual pioneers. This course will deal with a number of representative figures, such as Benedict, Francis & Clare of Assisi, John Calvin, Teresa of Avila, John Wesley, William Seymour, Mother Teresa, Archbishop Oscar Romero, and the spiritual traditions they founded (or influenced). Within each tradition a spiritual practice will be examined (and sometimes experienced) with an eye to its place in the postmodern church. All this will be set in the context of the broad sweep of the history and theology of Christian spirituality. MAT, MATM, MACL, MAIS 

SP 508 The Spiritual Disciplines.An introduction to the classic disciplines of the Christian life, set in the context of spiritual theology and the history of spirituality with an emphasis on understanding and practicing these disciplines.  

SP 515 Introduction to Christian Spirituality.An introduction to the classic disciplines of the spiritual life, examined biblically, historically and experientially, with special reference to the responsibilities of ministry. MDiv core: MIN1 

SP 520 Foundations for Spiritual Life.The maintenance of vital faith and personal devotion in the face of the pressures and problems of Christian service today, with a focus on prayer.

SP 526 Anglican Spirituality. Christians across denominations have in recent years seen a renewed interest in spirituality. Drawing upon its rich and diverse history and experience across the world, Anglicanism presents a unique blend of Evangelical, Catholic, Liberal and Charismatic spiritualities rooted deeply in Scripture and engaged with contemporary life. This course examines Anglican spirituality from theological, historical, experiential and practical perspectives as "a passionate balance".

SP 559 African-American Spirituality.Beginning with the religion of slaves, surveys the influence of African-American women, the music of the Black church, and the writings of poets and preachers upon African-American spirituality. Compares the themes of community, connectedness, and prayer in the lives and writings of Howard Thurman and Martin Luther King, Jr. and explores contemporary themes in African-American spirituality.  

 SP 590 Directed Study in Spirituality .  

   

MISSIONS (TM)  

TM 521 Congregations in the World. This course focuses on how the laity and clergy of a congregation can engage the world missionally. As a faith community being transformed by the gospel, a church loves, does good, seeks justice, shares hospitality, and celebrates. Biblical, theological, and practical frameworks will be developed to support an "incarnational" approach for the congregation's missional life. Topics include neighborhood engagement and partnerships, community organizing, evangelism, church planting, vocational discernment, relating mission to spirituality, and maintaining a praxis orientation. MDiv core: MIN1, MIN8 

TM 522 Homelessness, Congregations, and Community Partnerships. Students will study the extent, causes, complexities, and factors concerning homeless persons. This course will also serve as a practical guide for service among homeless persons that is compassionate and thoroughly rooted in the gospel. Instruction will focus on understanding the biblical basis for community service, identifying the complex needs of homeless persons in local communities, and starting and managing social services within local communities. Spiritual practices such as theological reflection, lectio divina, and incarnational solidarity will inform our lectures and discussions as we explore options for individual and congregational involvement. MDiv core: MIN8 

TM 530 Asian American Churches in Their Missional Contexts.This course focuses on how an Asian American church, including the laity and clergy, can engage the world missionally. There will be some orientation to global mission but the focus will be on the context of the congregation. As a faith community being transformed by the gospel, a church loves, does good, seeks justice, invites and celebrates. Biblical, theological and practical foundations will be studied with a praxis orientation that shapes an engagement that embodies and articulates the gospel. Topics include attending to neighbors and networks, relating mission to spirituality, diffusing missional leadership throughout the church, developing collaborations and non-profit organizations, engaging various forms of community organizing and development, and exploring the unique opportunities and challenges of Asian American churches. MDiv core: MIN8  

TM 531 Anglican Mission in a Global Context. "Mission-shaped church" is a term currently in vogue among Anglicans and non-Anglicans alike. Yet examination of Anglican history shows Anglicans to have been at the forefront of missionary endeavour since the 19th century. Anglican Mission in a Global Context looks at the models and experience of mission within Anglicanism past and present. It considers a number of paradigms used historically and contemporaneously in Anglican approaches to mission and asks whether these are sufficient to meet the global challenges of the 21st century.

 

WORSHIP STUDIES (WS) 

WS 500 Christian Worship: Leadership and Practice.This course will explore both the practical and theological dimensions of worship leadership. It will examine issues relating to contemporary, blended, and traditional worship and will consider the theological and aesthetic responsibilities that are a part of worship leadership roles, including forming and participating in leadership teams that shape worshipping congregations. A significant part of the course will be devoted to the actual practice of worship leadership and to th careful theological planning of worship events. Among the specific practical issues to be considered are contemporary music leadership, leading in prayer, public reading of scripture, use of body and voice, presiding over ritual, liturgical presence, and serving with hospitality and grace.  

WS 508 Ministry and Media: Theory and Production.This course will explore the theological and practical dimensions of the use of media in ministry. Students will both practice the use of media and technology and learn to evaluate their effectiveness in worship. Such production tools as film, studio recording, electronic amplification, staging, and computer graphics will be addressed and applied.

WS 518 Worship Ministry on the Lord's Day.This course will explore the history and theology of the ministry of Christian worship. After surveying the origins of corporate Christian prayer and their theological interpretations, the course will chart the development of the variety of forms of Christian worship and their theological interpretation. The course will then culminate in the ritual application of these historical models to worship today.  Class assignments will focus on the application of course concepts. MDiv core: MIN1, MIN6 

WS 519 Worship Ministry in the Seasons of Life.This course will explore the pastoral role of worship across two cycles of time: the seasons of the church year and ministry through the life-cycle. This course will explore the Christian origins of holy days such as Christmas and Easter and the seasons that surround them, as well as pastoral rites such as weddings and funerals.  This course will culminate in the application of the historical and theological resources to ministry in the church today. MDiv core: MIN1 

WS 523 Anglican Liturgy and Worship.Why is liturgy important and how do Anglicans practice it? What principles of worship underlie Anglican liturgy and how are these relevant for all traditions within and outside Anglicanism? By considering the Anglican liturgical tradition and experience, with examples from around the Anglican Communion, the course will enable both Anglicans and non-Anglicans to discover a greater understanding of their own experience of worship and communal life of faith.

 

YOUTH, FAMILY, AND CULTURE (YF) 

YF 500 Foundation of Youth Ministry.An introduction to youth ministry, for those new to or away from the field for some time. Topics include: characteristics of young people at various age levels; listening, teaching, speaking and program skills; planning and organizing activities; principles of recruiting, training and supervising volunteers. For those who work directly with youth and those who oversee others in youth program leadership. MDiv Core: MIN1. MIN4.  

YF 501 Introduction to Youth Ministry.This course gives an overview of youth ministry philosophy, models and theology while providing an opportunity for interaction with a wide variety of youth ministry leaders and organizations. Offered in conjunction with the Youth Specialties Convention; students will be exposed to a specifically identified and personally tailored experience in order to enhance their ministry training and expertise. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Youth Ministry Certificate Program. MDiv core: MIN1, MIN4  

YF 502 Leadership in Youth Ministry. Strategies for implementing a youth ministry: recruitment, budgeting, administration, planning.

YF 503 Youth Outreach and Evangelism.This course explores the biblical mandate to "go and make disciples" as it relates to the adolescent subculture. Students will learn how to articulate and pass on to others the biblical and theological view of evangelism and outreach. Through readings, lecture, projects, and discussion, students will learn how to design an incarnational as well as relational ministry program which takes seriously Christian care and evangelism with unbelievintg students. Issues covered are: the content and message of the Gospel as it relates to an age-specific population, contemporary models of youth evangelism, and the partnership and networking of local parishes and the parachurch. MDivcore: MIN1, MIN3  

YF 504 Introduction to Family Ministry.This course presents an analysis of the current understandings and "modes" of "family ministry" over against a theological, sociological and developmental understanding of the contemporary culture. Various models of family ministry will be examined, and through the use of case studies, lectures and research, students will learn how to create a family ministry that best suits the needs and vision of a given church or ministry organization. MDiv core: MIN1. MIN4  

YF 506 Urban Youth Ministry.Begins with a definition of urban and the need for middle class investigators to be sensitized to poverty, racism, and classism. Analyzes urban realities and the subcultures of urban youth and considers issues of gangs, drugs, crime, pregnancy, and welfare before dealing with social strategies and responses of youth leaders.

YF 507 Youth Ministry Communication.This course is designed to help students understand and analyze the development of youth disciples within the context of communication theory and praxis. It provides an understanding of Christocentric communication in four primary youth ministry contexts: evangelism, small groups discipleship, instructional teaching, and biblical preaching to an adolescent audience. Special emphases will be placed on integrating elements of the contemporary youth subculture, family dynamics that affect youth's receptivity to the gospel, and expanded training implementation for volunteer youth leaders.

YF 518 Ancient-Future Discipleship. This class will look at the tenets of the Apostles' Creed focusing on its historical development and its theological affirmations.  Students will then apply these affirmations to their life and ministry.

YF 520 Family Systems and Youth Ministry. This course provides the foundational concepts of family systems theory and its necessary integration in youth ministry praxis. Through readings, lectures, discussion, and projects, students will develop a systemic lens by which they will consider, evaluate, and develop effective ministry to youth and their families..

YF 590 Directed Study in Youth, Family, and Culture. 

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DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND MASTER OF THEOLOGY COURSES

The following classes and seminars are offered in support of the School of Theology's Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Theology programs, through the Center for Advanced Theological Studies. Unless otherwise noted, all seminars are offered for 6 units of credit.

 

DIVISION OF BIBLICAL STUDIES 

LG 806 Advanced Hebrew Grammar.This course is devoted to discussing and elucidating problems in Hebrew phonology, morphology, and syntax beyond the work possible in Beginning Hebrew and the MDiv exegetical core courses. In order to accomplish this goal, the course surveys the History of the Hebrew Language from its origins up until the Rabbinic period (ca. 1400 BCEñ200 CE). Attention will be paid to diachronic aspects (e.g., archaic Hebrew, late Biblical Hebrew, Rabbinic Hebrew), dialects (e.g., northern vs. southern), and register (e.g., poetry vs. prose, vernacular vs. literary)

LG 807 Hebrew Reading. This course helps students to reinforce skills learned in beginning Hebrew classes and to become acquainted with the variety of literature found in the Hebrew Bible. The class sessions and assignments emphasize reading, translating, and enjoying the Hebrew Bible.

LG 833 Beginning Ugaritic.This course, the first of a two-course sequence, will provide the student with an introduction to the orthography, phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Ugaritic language. Since it is necessary to provide the unvocalized text with vowels, the course is also an excellent introduction to Comparative Semitic phonology and morphology.

LG 834 Advanced Ugaritic. This course, a continuation of Beginning Ugaritic, LG833, will be devoted to further reading of Ugaritic literature

LG 835 Beginning Akkadian.A graded introduction to the grammar and writing system of Old Babylonian Akkadian. During this course we will read, in cuneiform copies and transliteration, a variety of genres of Akkadian texts: contracts, laws (Hammurabi's Code), omens, letters, royal inscriptions and hymns and prayers. Along our journey we will pay some attention to the history, culture, and religion of the Ancient Near East, the background of the Old Testament.

LG 836 Advanced Akkadian.This course continues the graded introduction to the grammar and writing system of Old Babylonian Akkadian begun in LG835. During this course we will read, in cuneiform copies and transliteration, a variety of genres of Akkadian texts: contracts, laws (Hammurabi's Code), omens, letters, royal inscriptions and hymns and prayers. Along our journey we will pay some attention to the history, culture, and religion of the Ancient Near East, the background of the Old Testament.

LG 846 Northwest Semitic Texts.This course will introduce the student to the more important remains of the literature of the NW Semitic sphere from the first millennium B.C., i.e., Old Phoenician, Old Aramaic, Old Hebrew, and Moabite

NT 801 New Testament Research Methods.This seminar focuses on the methods, the bibliographic resources and the cultural/historical contexts for advanced research in the New Testament; matters of writing, developing a thesis, constructing an argument, citation of sources and footnotes also receive attention. The various methods used in historical research and their appropriate functions in New Testament studies are considered, including an overview of the current state of New Testament studies. Bibliographic resources are identified, used and evaluated. Selected, relevant primary source writingsóJewish (apocrypha, pseudepigrapha, Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, Philo, rabbinical texts), Greco-Roman (religious and philosophical texts; historical, political and cultural texts) and early Church (Apostolic Fathers, Justin Martyr, Nag Hammadi texts and other second century literature)óare read and evaluated for their use and importance in New Testament studies. The value and use of nonliterary sources (archaeology, papyri, coins) are also identified and discussed.

NT 802 History of New Testament Scholarship. This seminar entails a survey of critical New Testament studies from the eighteenth century to the present with emphasis on the major movements and their leading proponents. Requirements will include extensive reading in the works that have proved to be watersheds in the discipline.

NT 824 Johannine Theology. This seminar will focus on Johannine christology, particularly as that christology is developed and presented vis-a-vis Judaism. Study of selections from primary sources, including the Old Testament Apocrypha, Philo, the Dead Sea Scrolls and rabbinic texts, will acquaint students with the contours on Johannine christology, as well as with some of the issues which arise in interpreting the Fourth Gospel against the background of these texts.

NT 843 Jesus and Paul.A discussion focusing on the continuity and discontinuity between the historical Jesus and the kerygma of Paul, with concentration especially on Paul's use of the Jesus tradition for his theology.

NT 860 The New Testament in Its Ancient Contexts. This course focuses on specific topics important to the study of the ancient social, cultural, and historical setting of the New Testament.

NT 866 Critical Issues in the Study of Paul.This seminar offers an examination of selected topics in the current study of the Pauline epistles, including literary, historical, and theological issues.

OT 801 Old Testament Critical Approaches. A seminar devoted to the various approaches used in current scholarship and their value in elucidating the Old Testament.

OT 805 Old Testament Theology Seminar.The first topic will be method in the study of Old Testament theology and the final topic will reconsider questions of method in the light of the seminar's study. In the intervening weeks the seminar will cover main themes of Old Testament theology, giving a week or two to aspects of its various themes, such as the God of Israel, the people of Israel, the spirituality of Israel, the hope of Israel and the world of Israel.

OT 865 Old Testament Ethics.The seminar will consider the methodology for studying Old Testament ethics and the way in which the Old Testament may be a resource for Christian ethics, noting the varying functions of narrative, law, prophecy, wisdom and psalmody. It will look from an ethical perspective at the nature of God in the Old Testament and at significant Old Testament themes such as creation, humanity, sex, sin, covenant, nationhood, justice, war and shalom.

OT 883 Ancient Near Eastern History, Literature, and Culture.This course surveys the history and culture of the ancient Near East from the earliest periods to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 b.c. Credit: 2 units. 

 

DIVISION OF THEOLOGY 

CH 801 Theology, Politics, and Modern Society.This seminar examines the political thought of leading twentieth-century theologians, including Barth, Bonhoeffer, Moltmann, Cone and Segundo, with emphasis on questions of authority, natural rights, equality, and liberation.

CH 808 Historiography.Designed as a seminar for graduate students in the fields of church history, historical theology and systematic theology. The theory and method of historical study will be examined in order to facilitate graduate level scholarship. On the theoretical side, students will be asked to think through issues of form and structure, of pattern and meaning; to recognize a distinction between "fact" and interpretation, primary datum and derivative account. On the side of method, the course will endeavor to acquaint students with a wide variety of historical tools. In addition, the question of method in research, compilation and final formulation of historical and theological theses will be addressed with a view to aiding students in their work on dissertations and subsequent scholarly publications.

CH 853 Seminar on Calvin and Calvinism.An introduction to the thought of John Calvin in his sixteenth-century context by reading and analyzing his Institutes and other selected works.

ET 837 Anabaptist Ethics and Theology. The purpose of the seminar is to examine ethical issues of particular relevance to the radical-reformation tradition, as well as to consider other current ethical issues from an Anabaptist perspective. The course will begin with a historical survey of radical church theology in order to see its relevance to Anabaptist ethical stances.

ET 832 Method for Concreteness in Christian Ethics.A systematic and comparative analysis of essential ingredients in an ethical method adequate for developing Christian character and grappling with concrete issues. An analytical model of essential ingredients will be used to compare representative methods in Christian ethics.

ET 848 Love, Justice, Community and Postmodern Ethics.The seminar will confront some constraints and constructive directions suggested by a postmodernist and communitarian criticism of Enlightenment influences on modern ethics. Some selected constructive responses to the criticism will be analyzed and compared, focusing on their normative definitions of love, justice and community. The seminar will seek to develop a constructive, historically situated understanding of love and justice that gives concrete guidance to community formation.

ST 819 Contemporary Christology I: European Trends.This advanced seminar is designed to examine the writings of a cross-section of leading European Protestant and Catholic theologians. Attention will be paid to theological method, and biblical and philosophical orientation. Texts to be studied will be selected from the writings of the following: Jürgen Moltmann, Wolfhart Pannenberg, Dietrich Ritschl, Edward Schillebeeckx, Hans Küng, Karl Rahner, Walter Kasper, and Piet Schoonenberg.

ST 829 Theological Method.A critical examination of competing methodologies in contemporary theology based on a study of recent writing. The seminar will examine such topics as types of ethnic theology, feminism, and liberation theology, forms of postmodernity, the nature of doctrine, and models of constructive theology. Required of Theology majors.

ST 833 The Politics of Jesus.This advanced seminar is designed to investigate the politics of Jesus in the context of social, economic, political and religious life in Second Temple Judaism under the Romans. Attention will be paid to primary sources including the Gospels, Josephus, and the Dead Sea Scrolls , in light of contemporary research. The purpose of the seminar is to promote a deeper understanding of Jesus and the politics of his day for students working in the fields of christology, New Testament and ethics.

ST 578 The Shape of Liturgical Theology.  The phrase Lex Orandi/Lex Credendi, attributed to the fifth-century monk Prosper of Aquitaine, has both described and defined the task of liturgical theology. This task is to define the relationship between the Law of Prayer (Lex Orandi) and the Law of Belief (Lex Credendi). This seminar will survey the history of this relationship and the contemporary expressions within the Christian churches today.

TH 806 Theological Uses of Postmodern Philosophy.An examination of recent changes in English-language philosophy that provide valuable resources for rethinking such issues as the nature of apologetics, theological method, and theological language.

 

Directed Readings and Independent Studies 

Students in the PhD and ThM programs design their programs in conjunction with their mentor. The student and the professor whose specialty the student desires to pursue agree together to participate in a directed readings or independent studies course and decide on the contents and requirements of the course before the quarter of study begins. The student must make arrangements for the course with the CATS program director before registration, and must register for academic credit within normal quarterly registration deadlines. The student is responsible to meet with the professor throughout the quarter of study to discuss his or her progress and the completion of the paper. All regular CATS policies and procedures apply to directed readings and independent studies courses.

 

Auditing Courses 

Auditing of 800-level seminars in SOT will not generally be permitted. Exceptions may be made in the case of those PhD students who have already passed, or are currently taking, Comprehensive Examinations, or for CATS PhD or ThM graduates. Such exceptions require approval by the faculty member responsible for the seminar and by the student's mentor. Auditing of combined 800/500 level courses at the 500-level is not permitted.


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