Department of Clinical Psychology

Character and Purpose 

The Department of Clinical Psychology of Fuller's School of Psychology is a unique venture in higher education. Its purpose is to prepare a distinctive kind of clinical psychologist: women and men whose understandings and actions are deeply informed by both psychology and the Christian faith. It is based on the conviction that the coupling of Christian understanding of women and men with refined clinical and research skills will produce Christian clinical psychologists with a special ability to help persons on their journeys to wholeness and salvation.

Toward these goals, an attempt is made to avoid reducing human beings to the descriptive data of psychology, and theology to a set of propositions about God. Instead, both disciplines are accorded mutual respect in an effort to impart to the student a genuine appreciation for the contributions of each.

At its simplest, theology may be defined as conceptualizing God and God's relationship with humankind in ways that are relevant to this day. In a sense, everyone is a theologian, holding views about God, but not everyone is a good and profitable theologian. For this higher purpose, a serious study of theology is imperative.

The data of theology consist primarily of the self-revealing acts and words of God contained in the Scriptures. Yet it is not enough simply to quote what Scripture itself contains. Theology must encounter and speak to each new generation and situation. Its task is to state the message of the Bible, making clear the relevance of this message to every person's current need.

On the other hand, psychology may be defined as the study of human behavior. It emphasizes the scientific approach, but it does not rule out the several other ways of knowing, such as self-reflective consciousness, creative and artistic expression, religious experience,  and philosophical thought.

The distinctiveness of the School of Psychology lies in its attempt to integrate these fields in theory, research, and practice. Through a series of didactic, experiential, and reflective endeavors, theology and psychology are examined, both separately and conjointly. Students are encouraged to reflect on their own faith (intrapersonal integration) and to determine how the data of psychology and theology can be combined (conceptual integration). Further, support is given to research efforts to assess the interconnections of faith and behavior (experimental integration) and to the mutual sharing of insights with others in related vocations such as the ministry (interprofessional integration). Most importantly, students are trained in the melding of psychology and theology in clinical practice (professional integration).

Faculty members hold the view that integration at any level is a profitable endeavor. They communicate a view of people as having been created in the image of God, with an abiding concern for their relationship to Jesus Christ. They convey the conviction that resources exist which transcend their own. They attempt to model in teaching and living the unique combination of sincere faith and clinical excellence which the School espouses.

Graduates of this program are qualified to serve in both the church and the wider community. As clinical psychologists they serve on hospital staffs, in private practice, in church-sponsored counseling centers, and in educational institutions.

Admission 

General standards for admission to Fuller Theological Seminary may be found in the Admission Standards section of this catalog.

Admission to the PhD or PsyD programs in clinical psychology of the School of Psychology requires that a student have earned a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. Admission to these programs is competitive. The entering student in the fall of 2013 had a median psychology grade point average of 3.57, and median scores of 155 Verbal, 149 Quantitative, and 4.25 Writing on the Graduate Record Examination.

The undergraduate major is most useful when it is in the social and behavioral sciences. A minimum of five courses in basic psychology (including subjects such as abnormal, developmental, experimental, physiological, social, learning, motivation, and personality psychology), and one course in statistics taken in a behavioral sciences department within the last five years, are required for entry into either program. Equally important for admission to the program are demonstrated commitment to the Christian faith and life, and personal qualities of high integrity, strong motivation for service, empathy for others, spiritual sensitivity, relationship skills, and a love of learning. These qualities will be evaluated through letters of recommendation from those who know the candidate well, as well as the applicant's statement of purpose.

Applicants to the Clinical Psychology program must submit the following:

  • an Application for Admission
  • official transcripts from all colleges and graduate schools attended
  • official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores (verbal, quantitative, analytical writing, and psychology subject test) from test administrations no more than five years previous to the date of application
  • four reference letters (one pastoral and three academic).

In addition to the general test of the Graduate Record Examination, applicants whose native language is not English must submit an official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of at least 600 (paper), 250 (computer), or 100 (internet), taken within the past two years, or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), Academic Format, with a minimum score of 7.0, taken within the last two years.  

Application deadlines and dates for notification of admission decisions can be found at http://www.fuller.edu/admissions/apply/deadlines-advanced.aspx. Applicants should be aware that the GRE must be taken far enough in advance for scores to reach the Office of Admissions by the appropriate deadline.

The Department of Psychology uses an individualized admission procedure for applicants to the PhD and PsyD programs. All applicants are reviewed by an admission committee consisting of faculty members and graduate students. Interviews in January and February are offered to selected applicants as part of the decision process. An invitation to interview is not a guarantee of acceptance to the program. Personal transportation and lodging costs are the responsibility of the applicant. If an in-person interview is not possible, a  Skype or telephone interview may be substituted. The admission committee reviews all applications and interviews, and makes recommendations to the entire clinical faculty, which then makes the final admission decisions.

Early Admission.An early admission process is available. To take advantage of this option, the application and all other required documents (references, GRE scores, etc.) must be postmarked no later than November 5. The GRE should be taken no later than September 15 in order for the score to be reported to Fuller by the November 5 deadline. The application fee is waived. Interviews take place on campus in January. Applicants will received notice regarding admission and financial aid decisions in February. This also allows early consideration for Fuller Housing.


Faculty Advisors 

The professor/student relationship is viewed as a mutual commitment. The professor makes a commitment to train each student to the doctoral level and expects a reciprocal commitment from the student to achieve doctoral quality work.

Each incoming student is assigned a faculty advisor, based on the student's research interests expressed in the application essays and on faculty availability.

Once they have entered the program, students are able to change advisors. The advisor supervises the dissertation, and in the case of PhD students, also the master's research.


CURRICULUM 

The Department of Clinical Psychology has adopted the scientist-practitioner model for its PhD program, and the local clinical scientist model for its PsyD program. Training in clinical psychology under these models includes a broad and up-to-date knowledge of general psychology, experiences and supervision in research, psychological assessment (interviewing, observation, testing), psychological intervention, personal growth and integration, and communication of information. A wide range of clinical approaches and research areas are represented in both the faculty and the curriculum.

The graduate course of study normally spans a period of six years for the PhD program and five years for the PsyD program. Students may select up to but no more than 16 units of course work per quarter, with the core of the curriculum scheduled during Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Each curriculum is divided into four parts: general psychology, research and evaluation, clinical psychology, and theology/integration.

Part I: General Psychology 

The core curriculum of general psychology provides the student with a solid grounding in the literature of general psychology, covering the following areas:

  • the historical roots of psychology
  • psychopathology
  • the biological, cognitive, affective, social, individual, and developmental bases of behavior

Comprehensive Examination.Students are expected to reach a superior level of mastery of general psychology, which is operationally defined by the faculty as a passing score on the practice exam for the Examination for Professional Practice of Psychology Online (PEPPPO), as outlined in the School of Psychology Student Handbook.

Students are encouraged to take the exam as soon as possible following the completion of general Psychology and Clinical Psychology course work.  It is recommended that comps be taken by Winter Quarter of the third year, and it is expected that students will achieve a passing score on the Comprehensive Exam no later than Spring Quarter of the third year.  

In recognition of the fact that the literature of general psychology changes rapidly, the validity of a passing comprehensive examination score will only be recognized for 7 years.  Students who have not graduated by that time must retake the PEPPPO and obtain a passing score. 

 

Part II: Research and Evaluation 

The curricula for all tracks include a series of three foundational general psychology courses in psychological measurement and statistics. In addition, students take a course in research design or program evaluation.

All students are also exposed to a wide variety of research topics by attending 18 research colloquia (out of 27 offered throughout their first three years of training). Students must register for PG856 Research Colloquium (2 units) in the quarter in which the final colloquium will be attended:

In addition, all students participate in research and/or evaluation experiences, with research teams led by faculty advisors. Thus research training involves three overlapping components: classroom instruction, direct experience, and faculty modeling. First, a thorough program of classroom instruction (PG850-PG853) lays a foundation of knowledge. For PhD students, this introduction culminates in the planning and execution of a master's-level research project under the supervision of the faculty advisor. The PsyD student learns to critique research methods and to conduct program evaluations. All students are exposed to research through the Research Colloquia. Second, students are continually involved in research teams under the guidance and supervision of their faculty advisor These experiences culminate in the independent dissertation. Third, students are expected to benefit from faculty models and colloquium speakers. Faculty are engaged in ongoing research, and serve as models of the scientist-practitioner and/or practitioner-evaluator.

Master's Research Project. Each PhD student must complete a master's research project prior to beginning the dissertation. Credit for the master's project is earned by registering for PG865 Master's Research. The amount of credit earned is based directly on the amount of time spent working on the research project. A minimum of 6 units is required.

Dissertation. Each PhD student must earn a minimum of 32 quarter hours of dissertation units (PG900) in completing the dissertation. Each PsyD student must earn a minimum of 8 quarter hours of dissertation units (PG902). Dissertations are prepared in accordance with the dissertation guidelines adopted by the faculty and available online.

Research Teams and Research Colloquia. Doctoral students participate in research teams throughout their graduate career. Psychology research colloquia, involving lectures by distinguished research psychologists, are presented three times each quarter. Each student must attend 18 colloquia, ideally within the student's first three years in the program. Students must sign in and out at each colloquium, and the student receives 2 units of credit by registering for PG856 Research Colloquium once the final colloquium has been attended.

Part III: Clinical Psychology 

The clinical psychology curriculum follows the guidelines set by the Committee on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association, and also makes available several additional courses required for licensure in California. The curriculum introduces each student to a broad sweep of target populations through clinical course work and supervised field training in various approved settings. Psychiatric inpatients and outpatients, persons with physical and/or developmental disabilities, those lacking social and/or economic resources, those from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, and other populations are among the groups served by students during their field training. Students also gain experience with a wide range of major assessment techniques, including behavioral observation and description, diagnostic interviewing, objective and projective testing, and specialized testing techniques such as neuropsychological assessment.

Clinical Psychology Interventions Courses (PC800-PC819). All doctoral students, regardless of their background, are required to complete clinical interventions coursework. All students are required to take courses in their first year of the program that will provide a foundation for clinical work. These three courses are in humanistic, psychodynamic, and cognitive and behavioral interventions. Requirements for the remaining intervention courses vary by program and track.

Intensive treatments of specific topics are offered in clinical seminars. Specific requirements for clinical seminars vary by program and track.

Field Training. The Fuller Psychological and Family Services clinic of the School of Psychology offers clinical training opportunities to many students in clinical psychology, especially during the early years of training. Students are also placed in other clinical facilities throughout the Los Angeles area for their practicum, clerkships, and internship placements. Internship placements are also made throughout the country, and students are encouraged to apply in all parts of the nation.

Practicum. Practicum training occurs during the first, second and third years of the program, and introduces the student to the wide array of professional activities basic to the practice of clinical psychology. All students complete an in-house placement in the first year. PsyD students have two 12-month placements, and PhD students have two nine-month placements. Students spend time each week in client contact, supervision groups, staff meetings, and paperwork (hours vary by program and track).

Clerkship. Students enroll in and contract for 12 hours of clerkship per week for 12 months, for a minimum of 576 hours for the year.  This usually begins Summer Quarter following the third year. Clerkship requires a one year commitment to one site, with a focus on psychological assessment. Prior to the clerkship, students must have successfully completed Practicum 2 and PC804 Introduction to Psychological Assessment.

Pre-Internship.  Pre-Internship is required of PhD students during their fifth year. Students must have successfully completed Clerkship prior to Pre-Internship.

Internship. The internship consists of a minimum of 40 hours per week for 12 months, for a total of 1,900 or more hours for the year.  Students earn 12 units per quarter for a total of 48 units. PsyD students take the internship their fifth year. PhD students take the internship during their sixth year.

Before being allowed to apply for an internship, students must have advanced to doctoral candidacy and have completed the dissertation proposal colloquium. The internship is the final, capstone clinical training requirement, and as such, the student must have successfully completed all coursework and other field training prior to the start of the internship.

Clinical Evaluation.The evaluation of a student's clinical competency is a continuing process which extends to the end of the internship year. The evaluation process is designed to ensure that the student is thoroughly prepared to: 1) practice as a skilled clinical psychologist and 2) pass crucial post-doctoral examinations such as those required for licensure and certification. Facility in the integration of psychology and theology and awareness of gender, ethnic and sociocultural issues are to be evaluated in all four phases described below. Further details may be found in the Clinical Psychology Student Handbook. The clinical curriculum is designed so that all clinical evaluation requirements may be met by satisfactory completion of required courses, practica, clerkship, and internship.

Phase I: Professional Issues Evaluation.This phase is designed to demonstrate that the student is knowledgeable in the professional areas of 1) ethics, 2) law, 3) professional literature, and 4) current professional problems and issues. Competency will be determined by obtaining passing grades in the relevant required course on ethics (PC803 Legal and Ethical Issues) and relevant components of the clinical intervbentions coursework and field training. This phase should be completed by the end of the clerkship year (prior to commencing the internship).

Phase II: Clinical Portfolio.In this phase, the student must demonstrate ability to 1) understand presenting problems; 2) administer, score, and interpret psychological test; 3) gather information regarding personal history, interpersonal relationships, and present functioning; 4) synthesize and summarize clinical interview and psychological test data; 5) formulate diagnostic impressions using the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual; 6) develop an appropriate treatment plan; 7) apply relevant research to treatment planning and therapeutic process; 8) engage in effective interventions; and 9) evaluate therapeutic progress. These elements are included in the clinical interventions coursework and field training. Prior to the completion of the clerkship year, the student will complete a standardized clinical portfolio that includes a record of testing experience verified by course instructors and field training supervisors and a compilation of various types of clinical reports. Taken together, these elements provide evidence of student competence in clinical work. The clinical portfolio must be approved by the director of clinical training as a precondition of successful completion of clerkship.

Phase III: Final Clinical Examination. In this phase, the student must demonstrate clinical competency appropriate for an entry-level professional. Satisfactory completion of an APPIC-member internship satisfies this requirement. Internships taken at non-APPIC sites require approval from the Director of Clinical Training and quarterly evaluations from internship supervisors. Students completing non-APPIC internships may also be required to sustain an oral clinical evaluation.

Personal Growth of Students. Doctoral students are strongly encouraged to participate in individual, marital, group, or family therapy. Students interested in psychotherapy are provided a list of therapists willing to see students at a reduced fee. In some cases, psychotherapy may also be required for an individual student.

Part IV: Theology and Integration 

The uniqueness of Fuller's doctoral programs in psychology lies in their emphasis on relationships between psychology and theology.

PhD Program.Each PhD student must complete a minimum of 72 quarter hours in theology and integration, culminating in a master's degree from the School of Theology or School of Intercultural Studies. The minimum requirement of 72 units is for the MA in Christian Leadership (MACL), with a curriculum modified for the School of Psychology student:

Seminary Core (28 units)

  • NT500 New Testament Introduction
  • OT500 Writings as Introduction to the Old Testament
  • CH504 Modern Church History or CH506 American Church History
  • ET501 Christian Ethics
  • MC500 Church and Mission in a Global Context
  • MT501 Doing Theology in Global Contexts
  • FS810 Human Development in Context

MACL Core (16 units)

  • SP500 Spiritual Traditions and Practices
  • MB501 Insights for Cultural Understanding
  • Any OT, NE, NS, or NT course
  • ST501, ST502, or ST503

Integration (20 units)

  • PI800 Introduction to Integration
  • PI806A/B Advanced Integration
  • 800-level Integration classes (12 units)

School of Theology Electives (8 units)

Students in the PhD program may choose instead to pursue the MA in Theology, MA in Theology and Ministry, MA in Intercultural Studies (School of Intercultural Studies), or Master of Divinity degree. Degrees vary in number of units required, and each degree has a version of its own curriculum which has been adapted for the School of Psychology student. Students are encouraged to consult with an advisor in the seminary's master's programs advising office to explore their options and plan their curriculum.

PsyD Program. Each PsyD student must complete a minimum of 32 units of theology and 20 units of integration. This does not result in a master's degree, but PsyD students are encouraged to complete a degree in theology or intercultural studies as well if this is consistent with their personal and professional goals. Required courses are as follows: 

  • NT500 New Testament Introduction
  • OT500 Writings as Introduction to the Old Testament
  • CH502 Medieval and Reformation History, CH503 Medieval and Reformation Theology, CH504 Modern Church History,  or CH506 American Church History (choose 1)
  • ET501 Christian Ethics, ET503 The Bible and Social Ethics, ET533 Christian Discipleship in a Secular Society, ET535 The Ethics of Life and Death, ET542 Faith and Politics, or ET543 The Theology and Ethics of Martin Luther King, Jr. (choose 1)
  • ST501 Systematic Theology 1: Theology and Anthropology
  • OT570 Job and Human Suffering or OT567 Psalms
  • PI503 Touchstone Course in Theology and Psychology
  • FS810 Human Development in Context

Students in the PsyD program may choose instead to pursue the MA in Christian Leadership, MA in Theology, MA in Theology and Ministry, MA in Intercultural Studies (School of Intercultural Studies), or Master of Divinity degree. Degrees vary in number of units required, and each degree has a version of its own curriculum which has been adapted for the School of Psychology student. Students are encouraged to consult with an advisor in the seminary's master's programs advising office to explore their options and plan their curriculum.

Theology Transfer Credit and Waivers.Students who have earned a two-year MA degree in theology from an accredited institution prior to entering a doctoral program in clinical psychology at Fuller will be required to complete 12 units of theology course work at Fuller's Pasadena campus instead of the full theology requirement described above. Those who completed an MDiv at an accredited institution prior to entering a doctoral program in the School of Psychology must complete 8 units of theology course work at Fuller's Pasadena campus. These courses will be determined in consultation with the student's theology academic advisor. In both cases, these units are in addition to the required 20 units of integration. Students in the Family Studies track of the PsyD degree who completed the MS degree in marital and family therapy at Fuller may apply up to 20 units of their theology coursework from that degree to the theology curriculum of the PsyD

General Integration Curriculum.All students are required to take 20 units of integration course work, including PI800 Introduction to Integration, PI856 Clinical Integration Colloquium, and PI806A/B Advanced Integration. Students may take additional integration seminars, School of Theology courses, and/or School of Intercultural Studies courses to fulfill their theology elective credits.

Clinical Integration Colloquium, involving presentations of clinical case material by practicing clinicians, are presented three times each quarter. Each student must attend 18 colloquia, ideally within the student's first three years in the program. Students must sign in and out at each colloquium, and the student receives two units of credit by registering for PI856 Clinical Integration Colloquium once the final colloquium has been attended.

The integration curriculum includes several types of courses:

  • Introduction to Integration (PI800) must be taken prior to any other integration seminar. It lays the theoretical and philosophical foundations for contemporary expressions of integration. 
  • The Integration Symposium (PI801) is offered on occasion in conjunction with the annual Integration Symposium lecture series.
  • Topical Integration Seminars are offered regularly. These focus on current topics of special interest to the field of integration.
  • Special Projects in Integration (PI803) is an independent study in integration. It does not qualify as one of the required integration courses.
  • Readings in Integration (PI805) are special or advanced integration readings not covered by regular integration courses.
  • Advanced Integration (PI806A/B)is designed to assist students in reflecting on integration. It is a two-part course, taken in the fall and spring quarters of the student's final year of coursework. Students will complete their final integration paper during the course. 
  • Family Integration seminars focus on integrative issues from a family studies perspective.
 

Some integration courses are designated as meeting a particular content area in integration: Religion and Therapy, Science and Religion, or Family. See the respective sections for each track below for further information on integration requirements


DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PHD) PROGRAM 

General Track 

General Psychology (32 units):

PG800 History and Systems of Psychology (4)
PG810 Physiological Psychology (4)
PG820 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (4)
PG830 Social Psychology (4)
PG843 Psychopathology (4)
PG855 Psychometric Theory (4)
FS810 Human Development in Context (4)
  Any general elective (or clinical seminar[s] after the comprehensive examination is passed) (4)

 

Research and Evaluation (52 units):

PG850 General Linear Models: Regression (4)
PG851 General Linear Models: ANOVA (4)
PG852 Advanced Research Methods (4)
PG856 Research Colloquium (2)
PG857 Individual Research (6)
PG900 Dissertation (32)

 

Clinical Psychology (140 units)

Each of the following courses: 
PC803 Legal and Ethical Issues (2)
PC804 Introduction to Psychological Assessment (4)
PC809 Clinical Interventions: Humanistic (4)
PC810 Clinical Interventions: Psychodynamic (4)
PC812 Clinical Interventions: Consultation and Supervision (4)
PC814 Clinical Interventions: Diversity Issues (4)
PC819 Clinical Interventions: Cognitive and Behavioral (4)


Two of the following five courses: 
PC811 Clinical Interventions: Gerontology (4)
PC813 Clinical Interventions: Child and Adolescent (4)
PC818 Clinical Interventions: Group Psychotherapy (4)
PF814 Family Therapy (4)
PF815 Marital Therapy (4)



Twelve additional units of clinical courses (12)


Each of the following courses: 
PC820 Practicum 1 (2)
PC821 Practicum 2 (12)
PC824 Clerkship (16)
PC840 Pre-Internship (16)
PC841 Internship (48)

 

Theology/Integration (72 units):

Seminary Core (28 units): 
NT500 New Testament Introduction (4)
OT500 Writings as Introduction to the Old Testament (4)
CH504 Modern Church History or CH506 American Church History (4)
ET501 Christian Ethics (4)
MC500 Church and Mission in a Global Context (4)
MT501 Doing Theology in Global Contexts (4)
FS810 Human Development in Context (4)


MACL Core (16 units) 
SP500 Spiritual Traditions and Practices 1 (4)
MB501 Insights for Cultural Understanding (4)
  Any OT, NE, NS, or NT course (4)
  ST501, ST502, or ST503 (4)



School of Theology Elective courses (8 units) 


Integration seminars (20 units) 
PI800 Introduction to Integration (4)
PI806 Advanced Integration (4)
  Any PI course designated as meeting religion and therapy content area (4)
  Any PI course designated as meeting science and religion content area (4)
  Any integration course (4)


Family Track 

The family psychology track includes 24 units of required coursework focused on marriage and family studies, taught primarily by faculty of the marriage and family department. It is expected that both the master's level project and the dissertation will also focus on a subject appropriate to the family track.

Transfer or Application of Units.Students already having a master's degree in marriage and family from a regionally accredited program at the time of acceptance into the family psychology track of the PhD may request a transfer of credit toward the required 24 units of family psychology coursework, with approval of the instructor(s) of the equivalent Fuller courses, the student's advisor, and the department chair. This is generally done on a course by course basis.

Persons who have earned their master's degree in marital and family therapy from Fuller's School of Psychology, if admitted to the family psychology track of the PhD, will be able to request that credit be applied toward the PhD for those courses in the 24 units above that they have already taken at the 500 level. Up to 20 units of the theology and intercultural studies credit from their master's degree may be applied as well.
 

General Psychology (28 units):

PG800 History and Systems of Psychology (4)
PG810 Physiological Psychology (4)
PG820 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (4)
PG830 Social Psychology (4)
PG843 Psychopathology (4)
PG855 Psychometric Theory (4)
FS510 Human Development in Context (4)

 

Research and Evaluation (52 units):

PG850 General Linear Models: Regression (4)
PG851 General Linear Models: ANOVA (4)
PG852 Advanced Research Methods (4)
PG856 Research Colloquium (2)
PG857 Individual Research (6)
PG900 Dissertation (32)

 

Clinical Psychology (140 units)

Each of the following courses: 
PC803 Legal and Ethical Issues (2)
PC804 Introduction to Psychological Assessment (4)
PC809 Clinical Interventions: Humanistic (4)
PC810 Clinical Interventions: Psychodynamic (4)
PC811 Clinical Interventions: Gerontology (4) or
PC813 Clinical Interventions: Child and Adolescent (4)
PC812 Clinical Interventions: Consultation and Supervision (4)
PC814 Clinical Interventions: Diversity Issues (4)
PC819 Clinical Interventions: Cognitive and Behavioral (4)
PE805 Child and Family Assessment (4)
PF814 Family Therapy (4)
PF815 Marital Therapy (4)
  Four additional units of clinical coursework (4)


Each of the following courses: 
PC820 Practicum 1 (2)
PC821 Practicum 2 (12)
PC824 Clerkship (16)
PC840 Pre-Internship (16)
PC841 Internship (48)

 

Theology/Integration (72 units):

Seminary Core (12 units): 
OT501 Writings as Introduction to the Old Testament (4)
NT500 New Testament Introduction (4)
CH504 Modern Church History or CH506 American Church History (4)
ET501 Christian Ethics (4)
MC500 Church and Mission in a Global Context (4)
MT501 Doing Theology in Global Contexts (4)
FS810 Human Development in Context (4)


MACL Core (16 units) 
SP500 Spiritual Traditions and Practices (4)
MB501 Insights for Cultural Understanding (4)
  Any OT, NE, NS, or NT course (4)
  ST501, ST502, or ST503 (4)


School of Theology Electives (8 units) 


Integration seminars (20 units) 
PI800 Introduction to Integration (4)
PI806 Advanced Integration (4)
  Additional integration courses, including at least 4 units in Family Integration (12)

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PsyDAnchor 


DOCTOR OF PSYCHOLOGY (PSYD) PROGRAM

General Track (258 units) 

General Psychology (32 units):

PG800 History and Systems of Psychology (4)
PG810 Physiological Psychology (4)
PG820 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (4)
PG830 Social Psychology (4)
PG843 Psychopathology (4)
PG855 Psychometric Theory (4)
FS810 Human Development in Context (4)
  Any general elective (or clinical seminar[s] after comprehensive examination is passed) (4)

 

Research and Evaluation (22 units):

PG850 General Linear Models: Regression (4)
PG851 General Linear Models: ANOVA (4)
PG853 Program Evaluation (4)
PG856 Research Colloquium (2)
PG902 Dissertation (8)

 

Clinical Psychology (140 units)

Each of the following courses: 
PC803 Legal and Ethical Issues (2)
PC804 Introduction to Psychological Assessment (4)
PC809 Clinical Interventions: Humanistic (4)
PC810 Clinical Interventions: Psychodynamic (4)
PC812 Clinical Interventions: Consultation and Supervision (4)
PC814 Clinical Interventions: Diversity Issues (4)
PC819 Clinical Interventions: Cognitive and Behavioral (4)
PC816 Program Administration (4)
PC817 Marketing Professional Services (2)


Two of the following five courses: 
PC811 Clinical Interventions: Gerontology (4)
PC813 Clinical Interventions: Child and Adolescent (4)
PF814 Family Therapy (4)
PF815 Marital Therapy (4)
PC818 Clinical Interventions: Group Psychotherapy (4)


Ten additional units from clinically-focused courses (10)


Each of the following courses: 
PC820 Practicum 1 (6)
PC821 Practicum 2 (14)
PC824 Clerkship (16)
PC841 Internship (48)

 

Theology/Integration (64 units):

Seminary Core (28 units) 
OT500 Writings as Introduction to the Old Testament (4)
NT500 New Testament Introduction (4)
CH504 Modern Church History or CH506 American Church History (4)
ET501 Christian Ethics (4)
MC500 Church and Mission in a Global Context (4)
MT501 Doing Theology in Global Contexts (4)
FS810 Human Development in Context (4)


 Additional Requirements (8 units) 
SP500 Spiritual Traditions and Practices (4)
MB501 Insights for Cultural Understanding (4)


General Electives (8 units) 


Integration seminars (20 units) 
PI800 Introduction to Integration (4)
PI806 Advanced Integration (4)
  Twelve additional units of integration, including one course from the science and religion content area and one from the therapy and religion area (12)


Family Track (258 units) 

The family psychology track includes 24 units of required coursework focused on marriage and family studies, taught primarily by faculty of the marriage and family department.

Transfer or Application of Units.Students already having a master's degree in marriage and family from a regionally accredited program at the time of acceptance into the family psychology track of the PsyD may request a transfer of credit toward the required 24 units of family psychology coursework, with approval of the student's advisor and the department chair. This is generally done on a course by course basis.

Persons who have earned their master's degree in marital and family therapy from Fuller's School of Psychology, if admitted to the family psychology track of the PsyD, will be able to request that credit be applied toward the PsyD for those courses in the 28 units above that they have already taken at the 500 level. In addition, they may apply up to 32 units of biblical studies and theology coursework from their MS degree, and up to 180 hours of practicum from FT550 Practicum 1, waiving PC820 Practicum 1 (6 units).

General Psychology (28 units):

PG800 History and Systems of Psychology (4)
PG810 Physiological Psychology (4)
PG820 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (4)
PG830 Social Psychology (4)
PG843 Psychopathology (4)
PG855 Psychometric Theory (4)
FS810 Human Development in Context (4)

 

Research and Evaluation (22 units):

PG850 General Linear Models: Regression (4)
PG851 General Linear Models: ANOVA (4)
PG853 Program Evaluation (4)
PG856 Research Colloquium (2)
PG900 Dissertation (8)

 

Clinical Psychology (136 units)

Each of the following courses: 
PC803 Legal and Ethical Issues (2)
PC804 Introduction to Psychological Assessment (4)
PC809 Clinical Interventions: Humanistic (4)
PC810 Clinical Interventions: Psychodynamic (4)
PC814 Clinical Interventions: Diversity Issues (4)
PC819 Clinical Interventions: Cognitive and Behavioral (4)
PF800 Introduction to Family Systems (4)
PF814 Family Therapy (4)
PF815 Marital Therapy (4)
PE805 Child and Family Assessment (4)
   
 One of the following courses: 
PC811 Clinical Interventions: Gerontology (4)
PC813 Clinical Interventions: Child and Adolescent (4)


Each of the following courses: 
PC820 Practicum 1 (6)
PC821 Practicum 2 (14)
PC824 Clerkship (16)
PC841 Internship (48)

 

Theology/Integration (64 units):

 Seminary Core (28 units) 
OT500 Writings as Introduction to the Old Testament (4)
NT500 New Testament Introduction (4)
CH504 Modern Church History or CH506 American Church History (4)
ET501 Christian Ethics (4)
MC500 Church and Mission in a Global Context (4)
MT501 Doing Theology in Global Contexts (4)
FS810 Human Development in Context (4)


 Additional Requirements (8 units) 
ST501 Spiritual Traditions and Practices (4)
MB501 Insights for Cultural Understanding (4)


General Electives (18)


Integration seminars (20 units) 
PI800 Introduction to Integration (4)
PI806 Advanced Integration (4)
  Twelve additional units of integration, including two courses in family integration (12)

GENERAL ACADEMIC ISSUES 

Registration.Registration is the student's responsibility. If in a given quarter a student fails to register, that student will receive a letter from the department chair. Failure to respond to the letter within two weeks will be understood as the student's resignation from the program. Special fees will be assessed for late registration, including late registration for nonclassroom experiences such as internships, dissertation, etc.

Student Handbook.In addition to the information contained in the seminary Student Handbook, essential policies, procedures and information concerning students in the program are contained in the Psychology Student Handbook. This handbook contains not only basic academic policies, but also guidelines for personal and professional behavior and procedures for processing grievances against students and faculty. Students are expected to comply with the policies in both handbooks.

Academic and Clinical Reviews. Students are formally reviewed at least once each year. All students are required to consent to academic and clinical reviews of their performance by faculty and/or appropriate clinical supervisors. The policy and procedures used for these reviews are detailed in the Psychology Student Handbook.

Transfer of Credit.Students who have completed graduate work in psychology at other institutions and desire a reduction in the number of psychology credit hours required to fulfill Fuller's degree requirements should contact the coordinator of academic affairs after admission. Approval of the student's advisor, the instructor of the parallel Fuller course, and the department chair is required. Only courses taken for a letter grade in which a grade of B or higher was earned will qualify for transfer. Transfer of credit does not necessarily mean that a course requirement will be waived, and waiver of a course requirement does not necessarily mean that graduate credits are being transferred.

Students who have completed graduate work in theology and desire a reduction in the number of theology credit hours required to earn a Fuller degree should contact the Academic Advising Office. The time limit for all master's degrees in the School of Theology has been set at 10 years. This includes all credit earned elsewhere and applied to the degree, as well as all credit earned at Fuller. Where the combined period represented by transfer credit and Fuller courses to be applied to a theology degree exceeds 10 years, it is subject to the approval of the Master's Academic Affairs Committee.

The PsyD requires five years of full-time study. The PhD degree requires six years of full-time study. These timelines may be compressed by one year for students entering with graduate-level course work in theology and/or psychology. A minimum of 48 units of transferable credit is required to qualify to apply for advanced standing, which involves "collapsing" the third and fourth years of the program. Students with limited clinical psychology course work in the 48 transferable units may be asked to complete certain clinical courses in order to be allowed to collapse the third and fourth years of the program. Application for this advanced standing takes place in the second year, and is subject to faculty approval.

Doctoral Candidacy. A student shall formally be considered a doctoral candidate when the following criteria have been met:

  • Passing the comprehensive examination.
  • Satisfactory completion of Practica I and II.
  • Satisfactory completion of all  but one of the clinical interventions courses required by the student's degree program
  • Satisfactory acceptance of the master's research project (PhD only), or its equivalent.
  • Formal faculty approval.

In-Sequence Master's Degree in Psychology 

A Master of Arts in Psychology degree will be granted to students en route to the PhD and PsyD degrees. No work is required outside of the regularly required courses and clinical experiences in the normal course of their doctoral work. Students will be eligible for the degree after they have completed the following requirements:

PhD

  • General psychology (28 units)
  • Clinical psychology (24 units, to include PC809, PC810, PC814, PC819)
  • Electives and seminars, excluding independent studies courses (16 units).
  • Individual Research (4 units)
  • Integration (8 units)
  • Theology course work (8 units)

PsyD

  • General psychology (28 units)
  • Clinical psychology (24 units, to include PC809, PC810, PC814, PC819)
  • Electives and seminars, excluding independent studies courses (14 units).
  • Practicum 1 (6 units)
  • Integration (8 units)
  • Theology course work (8 units)

These 88 units of psychology and theology are typically completed by the end of the student's second year in the program.

Students who have been approved for advanced standing must have the equivalent number of psychology units, have not been awarded another psychology degree based on the units transferred in, and have been in residency for at least one year to qualify for this degree.

Graduation and Commencement.A student may graduate at the end of any quarter after all requirements are met. In order to participate in the June Commencement exercises, a student must have 1) completed all course work, 2) completed all dissertation requirements by the dates specified, and 3) contracted to complete the Internship at an APPIC-member internship site by no later than the fall quarter graduation date of the same year. Participation in Commencement does not constitute graduation, which occurs only at the end of the quarter within which the Registrar's Office has determined that all requirements for the degree have been completed.

An updated schedule of deadlines for each requirement leading to graduation is included in the Clinical Psychology Student Handbook each year.



Contact
(626) 584-5200
(800) 235-2222
135 N. Oakland Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91182

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Admissions
admissions@fuller.edu