Pamela King teaching in classroom

In-Person Degrees and Certificates

Fuller remains committed to providing transformative, campus-based learning.  View our in-person program offerings and opportunities, and hear from Fuller faculty about the significant benefits of learning in a face-to-face context.

Looking for online or hybrid options? Explore our online programs.

Fuller Faculty on the Value of In-Person Learning

Creating a Faithful Community

We’ve been so busy explaining the new things we’re doing at Fuller that we may have forgotten to emphasize how strongly we still believe in the core of Fuller—the one where students and faculty come to a main campus and participate in a transformative theological education. And eat street tacos together.

Why do I love our community of real people in real spaces?

A theological school is about formation, not just education, and anyone who has attended a traditional seminary can attest that much of their formation took place outside of formal classes—sitting around a lunch table, or bumping into each other on the quad. In-person education is a creation of a faithful community. For a seminary like Fuller, that certainly means faith in God; but it also means faith in a communal mission. Like a lot of the works of faith, this mission is costly, but at least it comes with tacos, and the flash in your colleague’s eye when they laugh.

Christopher Hays, D. Wilson Moore Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Studies
ChrisHays_747x747

Creating a Faithful Community

We’ve been so busy explaining the new things we’re doing at Fuller that we may have forgotten to emphasize how strongly we still believe in the core of Fuller—the one where students and faculty come to a main campus and participate in a transformative theological education. And eat street tacos together.

Why do I love our community of real people in real spaces?

A theological school is about formation, not just education, and anyone who has attended a traditional seminary can attest that much of their formation took place outside of formal classes—sitting around a lunch table, or bumping into each other on the quad. In-person education is a creation of a faithful community. For a seminary like Fuller, that certainly means faith in God; but it also means faith in a communal mission. Like a lot of the works of faith, this mission is costly, but at least it comes with tacos, and the flash in your colleague’s eye when they laugh.

Christopher Hays, D. Wilson Moore Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Lisa Lamb Fuller FacultyBlowing Things Up in the Lab

Some years ago Fuller created a space for preaching that bore the odd name, the “Preaching Lab.” Labs are spaces where bold experiments can happen safely. Students gamely strap on goggles and gloves, then dive in and try things. One dares to let a psalm of lament stand as a cry unanswered, a sermon left untied, with no tidy bow. One shares a story of a ragged, bitter marriage season that felt like living in the valley of dry bones, surprising herself with its rawness still. “Pardon my tears,” she says, and as she ends, she’s met with hugs and prayers. We lack Bunsen burners, but this lab has sparked laughter, tears, and even transformation. This unadorned space so often becomes holy ground, and to be present in those moments is magical.

Lisa Washington Lamb, Visiting Assistant Professor of Preaching
Lisa Lamb Fuller Faculty

Blowing Things Up in the Lab

Some years ago Fuller created a space for preaching that bore the odd name, the “Preaching Lab.” Labs are spaces where bold experiments can happen safely. Students gamely strap on goggles and gloves, then dive in and try things. One dares to let a psalm of lament stand as a cry unanswered, a sermon left untied, with no tidy bow. One shares a story of a ragged, bitter marriage season that felt like living in the valley of dry bones, surprising herself with its rawness still. “Pardon my tears,” she says, and as she ends, she’s met with hugs and prayers. We lack Bunsen burners, but this lab has sparked laughter, tears, and even transformation. This unadorned space so often becomes holy ground, and to be present in those moments is magical.

Lisa Washington Lamb, Visiting Assistant Professor of Preaching

Amos YongAn Immersive Learning Experience

Moving to a seminary or attending geophysical seminary classes involves resocialization and rehabituation of our lives in a radical manner––meaning, from the ground up. Such shakeup inevitably invites new schedules and rhythms, allowing a more focused approach to theological study. An in-person program has long been the traditional format since one of its primary advantages––that of inserting learners in an embodied way into a community of inquiry––remains unreplicable in the online platform.

Major communities of inquiry like Fuller Seminary schedule multiple lectures, discussion groups, symposia, and other scholarly activities during the course of the term. Those who are geophysically present enter into and build relationships with others––faculty, other learners, and guests of the institution––in ways not possible for online learners. Traditionalists have always highlighted the immersive character of the historic seminary experience, which effectively baptizes learners into the multidirectional conversations through which the life of the mind is lived out across the institutional environment.

Amos Yong, Professor of Theology and Mission
Amos Yong

An Immersive Learning Experience

Moving to a seminary or attending geophysical seminary classes involves resocialization and rehabituation of our lives in a radical manner––meaning, from the ground up. Such shakeup inevitably invites new schedules and rhythms, allowing a more focused approach to theological study. An in-person program has long been the traditional format since one of its primary advantages––that of inserting learners in an embodied way into a community of inquiry––remains unreplicable in the online platform.

Major communities of inquiry like Fuller Seminary schedule multiple lectures, discussion groups, symposia, and other scholarly activities during the course of the term. Those who are geophysically present enter into and build relationships with others––faculty, other learners, and guests of the institution––in ways not possible for online learners. Traditionalists have always highlighted the immersive character of the historic seminary experience, which effectively baptizes learners into the multidirectional conversations through which the life of the mind is lived out across the institutional environment.

Amos Yong, Professor of Theology and Mission

An “In-Person” God

As Revelation 21 suggests, the ultimate end to which the whole of the created order is moving is one in which God takes up residence with humanity in geophysical space. God quite literally “tabernacles with” humanity. Given who God is, it is inconceivable to imagine a Fuller Seminary without some kind of residential learning. In the absence of a geophysical residence, Fuller would be like a voice without a body. Right now we are imagining not only what the new campus in Pomona will look and feel like, but also the unique educational opportunities our new residence will afford. The impending move has also presented us with a new opportunity to reaffirm our commitment not only to residential learning but also to the many ways in which the Spirit of God is present “wherever two or three are gathered” in the name of Christ (Matt 18:20).

Kutter Callaway, Assistant Professor of Theology and Culture
Prof_KutterCallaway

An “In-Person” God

As Revelation 21 suggests, the ultimate end to which the whole of the created order is moving is one in which God takes up residence with humanity in geophysical space. God quite literally “tabernacles with” humanity. Given who God is, it is inconceivable to imagine a Fuller Seminary without some kind of residential learning. In the absence of a geophysical residence, Fuller would be like a voice without a body. Right now are imagining not only what the new campus in Pomona will look and feel like, but also the unique educational opportunities our new residence will afford. The impending move has also presented us with a new opportunity to reaffirm our commitment not only to residential learning but also to the many ways in which the Spirit of God is present “wherever two or three are gathered” in the name of Christ (Matt 18:20).

Kutter Callaway, Assistant Professor of Theology and Culture

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